Asthma entities

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Asthma is a syndrome characterized by variable airflow limitation airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation. Considering asthma in aggregate, it is clear that a number of distinct mechanisms underlie the development of this disorder. In some patients, the mechanistic distinctions can be clearly drawn, and important therapeutic insights can be gained. In other patients, several mechanisms may coexist, or it may be impossible to separate them with current methods and technology. To distinguish subsets of asthma is more than an academic exercise. For both clinicians and asthma researchers, it is valuable to distinguish asthma subtypes as clearly as possible. Clinicians strive to prescribe the most effective, most safe and most cost effective therapy possible, and understanding asthma subsets and their underlying mechanistic differences can substantively facilitate achieving that objective. Asthma research is often limited by significant, and sometimes dramatic intersubject variability. It is likely that at least some of that variability may arise from the (unrecognized) mechanistic heterogeneity of asthma. Better definition and selection of more homogeneous subsets of asthma may then lead to greater statistical power, and more definitive conclusions from asthma investigations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)595-603
Number of pages9
JournalDrugs of Today
Volume35
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Asthma
Research Personnel
Exercise
Inflammation
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Therapeutics
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Calhoun, W. (1999). Asthma entities. Drugs of Today, 35(8), 595-603.

Asthma entities. / Calhoun, William.

In: Drugs of Today, Vol. 35, No. 8, 08.1999, p. 595-603.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Calhoun, W 1999, 'Asthma entities', Drugs of Today, vol. 35, no. 8, pp. 595-603.
Calhoun W. Asthma entities. Drugs of Today. 1999 Aug;35(8):595-603.
Calhoun, William. / Asthma entities. In: Drugs of Today. 1999 ; Vol. 35, No. 8. pp. 595-603.
@article{f63379c42c6944f4b8522d3ad7891754,
title = "Asthma entities",
abstract = "Asthma is a syndrome characterized by variable airflow limitation airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation. Considering asthma in aggregate, it is clear that a number of distinct mechanisms underlie the development of this disorder. In some patients, the mechanistic distinctions can be clearly drawn, and important therapeutic insights can be gained. In other patients, several mechanisms may coexist, or it may be impossible to separate them with current methods and technology. To distinguish subsets of asthma is more than an academic exercise. For both clinicians and asthma researchers, it is valuable to distinguish asthma subtypes as clearly as possible. Clinicians strive to prescribe the most effective, most safe and most cost effective therapy possible, and understanding asthma subsets and their underlying mechanistic differences can substantively facilitate achieving that objective. Asthma research is often limited by significant, and sometimes dramatic intersubject variability. It is likely that at least some of that variability may arise from the (unrecognized) mechanistic heterogeneity of asthma. Better definition and selection of more homogeneous subsets of asthma may then lead to greater statistical power, and more definitive conclusions from asthma investigations.",
author = "William Calhoun",
year = "1999",
month = "8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "35",
pages = "595--603",
journal = "Drugs of Today",
issn = "1699-3993",
publisher = "Prous Science",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Asthma entities

AU - Calhoun, William

PY - 1999/8

Y1 - 1999/8

N2 - Asthma is a syndrome characterized by variable airflow limitation airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation. Considering asthma in aggregate, it is clear that a number of distinct mechanisms underlie the development of this disorder. In some patients, the mechanistic distinctions can be clearly drawn, and important therapeutic insights can be gained. In other patients, several mechanisms may coexist, or it may be impossible to separate them with current methods and technology. To distinguish subsets of asthma is more than an academic exercise. For both clinicians and asthma researchers, it is valuable to distinguish asthma subtypes as clearly as possible. Clinicians strive to prescribe the most effective, most safe and most cost effective therapy possible, and understanding asthma subsets and their underlying mechanistic differences can substantively facilitate achieving that objective. Asthma research is often limited by significant, and sometimes dramatic intersubject variability. It is likely that at least some of that variability may arise from the (unrecognized) mechanistic heterogeneity of asthma. Better definition and selection of more homogeneous subsets of asthma may then lead to greater statistical power, and more definitive conclusions from asthma investigations.

AB - Asthma is a syndrome characterized by variable airflow limitation airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation. Considering asthma in aggregate, it is clear that a number of distinct mechanisms underlie the development of this disorder. In some patients, the mechanistic distinctions can be clearly drawn, and important therapeutic insights can be gained. In other patients, several mechanisms may coexist, or it may be impossible to separate them with current methods and technology. To distinguish subsets of asthma is more than an academic exercise. For both clinicians and asthma researchers, it is valuable to distinguish asthma subtypes as clearly as possible. Clinicians strive to prescribe the most effective, most safe and most cost effective therapy possible, and understanding asthma subsets and their underlying mechanistic differences can substantively facilitate achieving that objective. Asthma research is often limited by significant, and sometimes dramatic intersubject variability. It is likely that at least some of that variability may arise from the (unrecognized) mechanistic heterogeneity of asthma. Better definition and selection of more homogeneous subsets of asthma may then lead to greater statistical power, and more definitive conclusions from asthma investigations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032709772&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032709772&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 595

EP - 603

JO - Drugs of Today

JF - Drugs of Today

SN - 1699-3993

IS - 8

ER -