At-home recovery following hospitalization for bronchiolitis

James M. Robbins, Uma R. Kotagal, Narendra M. Kini, Wilbert H. Mason, James G. Parker, Mark S. Kirschbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives.- To characterize the at-home recovery of infants after hospitalization for bronchiolitis, the impact of recovery from this illness on the family, and the association between delayed infant recovery and parental satisfaction with hospital care. Methods.- Otherwi se healthy infants less than 1 year of age admitted to 6 children's hospitals were eligible. Telephone interviews with 486 parents (85% of sampled), 1-2 weeks following discharge, addressed functional recovery, lingering symptoms, family disruption, returns to the emergency department, and parental recall of satisfaction with care. Results.- Two thirds of infants experienced difficulties with normal routines (feeding, sleeping, contentedness, liveliness) on the day of discharge. By 5 days at home, 22% continued to experience disruption in sleeping, and 16% in feeding routines. Coughing (56%) and wheezing (27%) were common 4 to 6 days after discharge. Parents who reported longer delays in return to normal family routines took additional time off work, kept their infants out of day care twice as many days, and were more likely to take their infants to the doctor or hospital for repeat medical care. Parents from families slower to return to a normal routine recalled the hospital stay less favorably. Conclusions.- A small but important proportion of infants have a protracted recovery period following hospitalization for bronchiolitis. Delayed recovery is associated with parental work time loss and less favorable parental impressions of care in the hospital. Anticipatory guidance about home recovery could allow parents to plan for extended home care and improve satisfaction with hospital care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-14
Number of pages7
JournalAmbulatory Pediatrics
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bronchiolitis
Hospitalization
Parents
Respiratory Sounds
Home Care Services
Hospital Emergency Service
Length of Stay
Interviews

Keywords

  • Bronchiolitis
  • Hospitalizations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Robbins, J. M., Kotagal, U. R., Kini, N. M., Mason, W. H., Parker, J. G., & Kirschbaum, M. S. (2006). At-home recovery following hospitalization for bronchiolitis. Ambulatory Pediatrics, 6(1), 8-14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ambp.2005.09.001

At-home recovery following hospitalization for bronchiolitis. / Robbins, James M.; Kotagal, Uma R.; Kini, Narendra M.; Mason, Wilbert H.; Parker, James G.; Kirschbaum, Mark S.

In: Ambulatory Pediatrics, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 8-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robbins, JM, Kotagal, UR, Kini, NM, Mason, WH, Parker, JG & Kirschbaum, MS 2006, 'At-home recovery following hospitalization for bronchiolitis', Ambulatory Pediatrics, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 8-14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ambp.2005.09.001
Robbins JM, Kotagal UR, Kini NM, Mason WH, Parker JG, Kirschbaum MS. At-home recovery following hospitalization for bronchiolitis. Ambulatory Pediatrics. 2006 Jan;6(1):8-14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ambp.2005.09.001
Robbins, James M. ; Kotagal, Uma R. ; Kini, Narendra M. ; Mason, Wilbert H. ; Parker, James G. ; Kirschbaum, Mark S. / At-home recovery following hospitalization for bronchiolitis. In: Ambulatory Pediatrics. 2006 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 8-14.
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