Autologous tissue-engineered trachea with sheep nasal chondrocytes

Koji Kojima, Lawrence J. Bonassar, Amit K. Roy, Charles A. Vacanti, Joaquin Cortiella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the ability of autologous tissue-engineered trachea shaped in a helix to form the structural component of a functional tracheal replacement. Methods: Nasal septum were harvested from six 2-month-old sheep. Chondrocytes and fibroblasts were isolated from tissue and cultured in media for 2 weeks. Both types of cells were seeded onto separate nonwoven meshes of polyglycolic acid. The chondrocyte-seeded mesh was wound around a 20-mm-diameter x 50-mm-long helical template and then covered with the fibroblast-seeded mesh. In 2 separate studies the implants were placed either in a subcutaneous pocket in the nude rat (rat tissue-engineered trachea) or in the neck of a sheep (sheep tissue-engineered trachea). Rat tissue-engineered tracheas were harvested after 8 weeks and analyzed by means of histology and biochemistry. Sheep tissue-engineered tracheas were harvested from the neck at 8 weeks and anastomosed into a 5-cm defect in the sheep trachea. Results: Sheep receiving tissue-engineered trachea grafts survived for 2 to 7 days after implantation. Gross morphology and tissue morphology were similar to that of native tracheas. Hematoxylin-and-eosin staining of rat tissue-engineered tracheas and sheep tissue-engineered tracheas revealed the presence of mature cartilage surrounded by connective tissue. Safranin-O staining showed that rat tissue-engineered tracheas and sheep tissue-engineered tracheas had similar morphologies to native tracheal cartilage. Collagen, proteoglycan, and cell contents were similar to those seen in native tracheal tissue in rat tissue-engineered tracheas. Collagen and cell contents of sheep tissue-engineered tracheas were elevated compared with that of normal tracheas, whereas proteoglycan content was less than that found in normal tracheas. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of recreating the cartilage and fibrous portion of the trachea with autologous tissue harvested from single procedure. This approach might provide a benefit to individuals needing tracheal resection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1177-1184
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume123
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chondrocytes
Trachea
Nose
Sheep
Cartilage
Proteoglycans
Neck
Collagen
Fibroblasts
Nude Rats
Staining and Labeling
Polyglycolic Acid
Nasal Septum
Feasibility Studies
Hematoxylin
Eosine Yellowish-(YS)
Biochemistry
Connective Tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Autologous tissue-engineered trachea with sheep nasal chondrocytes. / Kojima, Koji; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Roy, Amit K.; Vacanti, Charles A.; Cortiella, Joaquin.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 123, No. 6, 01.06.2002, p. 1177-1184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kojima, Koji ; Bonassar, Lawrence J. ; Roy, Amit K. ; Vacanti, Charles A. ; Cortiella, Joaquin. / Autologous tissue-engineered trachea with sheep nasal chondrocytes. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 2002 ; Vol. 123, No. 6. pp. 1177-1184.
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