Bacteria-infected fibroblasts have enhanced susceptibility to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor

Gary R. Klimpel, Radwan Shaban, David Niesel

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Abstract

The susceptibility of bacteria-infected fibroblasts to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor was investigated. L cells infected with Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, or Listeria monocytogenes, had an enhanced susceptibility to the cytotoxic activity of TNF-α. This enhanced susceptibility was dependent upon the challenge dose of bacteria, the concentration of TNF, and upon the exposure time of bacteria-infected cells to TNF. L cells infected with S. flexneri were susceptible to the cytotoxic action of TNF at 2 to 6 h after bacterial infection. In contrast, L cells infected with S. typhimurium or L. monocytogenes did not show enhanced susceptibility to TNF until 14 h postbacterial infection and exposure to TNF. Enhanced susceptibility to TNF was dependent on bacterial invasion because fibroblasts pretreated with a noninvasive isogenic variant of S. flexneri, UV-treated invasive bacteria, bacterial cultural supernatant, or bacteria LPS were no more susceptible to TNF than untreated cells. Enhanced susceptibility to TNF by bacteria-infected cells was not unique to L cells. Mouse embryo fibroblasts and HeLa cells also showed similar reactivities after bacteria infection. Bacteria-infected cells were greatly suppressed in host cell protein synthesis that may play an important role in their enhanced susceptibility to TNF. These results suggest that an important role of TNF in host defense against bacterial infections is its cytotoxic activity against bacteria-infected cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)711-717
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume145
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jul 15 1990

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Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Fibroblasts
Bacteria
Shigella flexneri
Listeria monocytogenes
Salmonella typhimurium
Bacterial Infections
Infection
HeLa Cells
Embryonic Structures
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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Bacteria-infected fibroblasts have enhanced susceptibility to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor. / Klimpel, Gary R.; Shaban, Radwan; Niesel, David.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 145, No. 2, 15.07.1990, p. 711-717.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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