Bacterial translocation and its relationship to visceral blood flow, gut mucosal ornithine decarboxylase activity, and DNA in pigs

R. Saydjari, G. I J M Beerthuizen, Courtney Townsend, David Herndon, J. C. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship of bacterial translocation to gut blood flow and mucosal integrity was studied in pigs. Three groups of miniature pigs were studied: sham injured (controls) (n = 7), 50% mechanical reduction in blood flow to the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) (n = 6), and a 40% third-degree cutaneous flame burn (n = 9). Forty-eight hours after injury, animals were killed and organ samples obtained for analysis. Bacteria of the same biotype as that found in the intestinal lumen were present in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of 9 of 9 burned pigs and 5 of 6 pigs undergoing partial vascular occlusion. The DNA content and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity were increased in the colon mucosa of animals from both the reduced-flow and burn-injured groups compared with control animals. Decreased blood flow to the gut may contribute to the development of bacterial translocation. In addition, intestinal regenerative capacity remains intact 48 hours after injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-644
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma
Volume31
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1991

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Bacterial Translocation
Ornithine Decarboxylase
Swine
DNA
Celiac Artery
Superior Mesenteric Artery
Wounds and Injuries
Burns
Blood Vessels
Colon
Mucous Membrane
Lymph Nodes
Bacteria
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Bacterial translocation and its relationship to visceral blood flow, gut mucosal ornithine decarboxylase activity, and DNA in pigs. / Saydjari, R.; Beerthuizen, G. I J M; Townsend, Courtney; Herndon, David; Thompson, J. C.

In: Journal of Trauma, Vol. 31, No. 5, 1991, p. 639-644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saydjari, R. ; Beerthuizen, G. I J M ; Townsend, Courtney ; Herndon, David ; Thompson, J. C. / Bacterial translocation and its relationship to visceral blood flow, gut mucosal ornithine decarboxylase activity, and DNA in pigs. In: Journal of Trauma. 1991 ; Vol. 31, No. 5. pp. 639-644.
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