Beach holiday sunburn: The sunscreen paradox and gender differences

Edward M. McCarthy, Kristen P. Ethridge, Richard Wagner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A survey about sunbathing practices was performed on a summer holiday weekend at a Galveston beach. The likelihood of sunburn increased with increasing duration of sun exposure, with 100% of subjects experiencing sunburn after exposure ≥ 4.5 hours. Men exhibited a significantly higher frequency of sunburn, employed fewer sun-protective measures, and demonstrated less knowledge concerning sun safety information and skin cancer than women. This information suggests a need for greater educational efforts directed toward changing public attitudes about preventing sunburn, especially those of men, that currently lead to high-risk sunbathing behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-42
Number of pages6
JournalCutis
Volume64
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 1999

Fingerprint

Sunburn
Sunscreening Agents
Holidays
Sunbathing
Solar System
Skin Neoplasms
Risk-Taking
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

McCarthy, E. M., Ethridge, K. P., & Wagner, R. (1999). Beach holiday sunburn: The sunscreen paradox and gender differences. Cutis, 64(1), 37-42.

Beach holiday sunburn : The sunscreen paradox and gender differences. / McCarthy, Edward M.; Ethridge, Kristen P.; Wagner, Richard.

In: Cutis, Vol. 64, No. 1, 07.1999, p. 37-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCarthy, EM, Ethridge, KP & Wagner, R 1999, 'Beach holiday sunburn: The sunscreen paradox and gender differences', Cutis, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 37-42.
McCarthy, Edward M. ; Ethridge, Kristen P. ; Wagner, Richard. / Beach holiday sunburn : The sunscreen paradox and gender differences. In: Cutis. 1999 ; Vol. 64, No. 1. pp. 37-42.
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