Becoming Luis: A photo essay on growing up in Bolivia

Jerome Crowder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Luis is an Aymara boy whom I have known since his birth in 1996. Although he and his mother were not initially central to my research on migration in the Andes, they belong to the family I worked with in El Alto, Bolivia. During a return visit ten years later, I recognized the importance of his story within my research, and thus reviewed my field notes and photo library to find images and stories about them. Photography plays a major role in my research, as I use images as mementos as well as stimuli for discussion. With the benefit of 20/20 hindsight and 15 years' distance, Luis and Basilia represent the quintessential migrant experience, one I may have overlooked if I had not asked new questions of old data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-122
Number of pages16
JournalVisual Anthropology Review
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bolivia
photography
stimulus
migrant
migration
Photo Essay
experience
Photography
Alto
Boys
Migrants
Stimulus
Andes
Hindsight
Field Notes

Keywords

  • Aymara
  • Bolivia
  • compadrazco
  • El Alto
  • image analysis
  • migration
  • photo essay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Becoming Luis : A photo essay on growing up in Bolivia. / Crowder, Jerome.

In: Visual Anthropology Review, Vol. 29, No. 2, 09.2013, p. 107-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crowder, Jerome. / Becoming Luis : A photo essay on growing up in Bolivia. In: Visual Anthropology Review. 2013 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 107-122.
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