Behavior therapy and the transdermal nicotine patch: Effects on cessation outcome, affect, and coping

Paul M. Cinciripini, Lynn G. Cinciripini, Helen Van Vunakis, Annette Wallfisch, Waheedul Haque

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The process and outcome of a smoking cessation program using behavior therapy alone (BT) or behavior therapy plus the nicotine patch (BTP) was studied in 64 participants. Participants quit smoking on a target date after a period of ad libitum smoking, cognitive-behavior therapy preparing them for cessation, and behavioral rehearsal for high-risk situations, including stress management, and coping with negative affect. Abstinence was significantly higher for the BTP group versus the BT group from the end of behavioral treatment (79% vs. 63%) through the 3-month follow-up (p < .01), with the effects weakening at the 6- (p = .06) and 12-month marks (p = 38% vs. 22%). More general distress was observed among BT versus BTP participants (i.e., increased withdrawal, tension, fatigue, and coping frequency with decreased coping effort; coping-to-urge ratio). The coping behavior of the BTP group may have been more effective than that of the BT group, as indicated by their significantly higher level of self-efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-323
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1996

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Tobacco Use Cessation Products
Behavior Therapy
Smoking
Psychological Adaptation
Cognitive Therapy
Smoking Cessation
Self Efficacy
Fatigue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Behavior therapy and the transdermal nicotine patch : Effects on cessation outcome, affect, and coping. / Cinciripini, Paul M.; Cinciripini, Lynn G.; Van Vunakis, Helen; Wallfisch, Annette; Haque, Waheedul.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 64, No. 2, 04.1996, p. 314-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cinciripini, Paul M. ; Cinciripini, Lynn G. ; Van Vunakis, Helen ; Wallfisch, Annette ; Haque, Waheedul. / Behavior therapy and the transdermal nicotine patch : Effects on cessation outcome, affect, and coping. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1996 ; Vol. 64, No. 2. pp. 314-323.
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