Bell's palsy: Update on causes, recognition, management

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that viral infection is the most likely underlying cause of Bell's palsy. Rapidity of onset is a due to the diagnosis; unilateral facial weakness or paralysis develops over 24 to 48 hours. Rule out other causes of peripheral facial paralysis, such as Ramsay Hunt syndrome and Lyme disease. Although most cases of Bell's palsy resolve without medical or surgical intervention, older patients and those with abnormal electroneurographic results are less likely to have complete recovery of facial function. Early treatment with an oral corticosteroid is likely to enhance recovery; concurrent use of acydovir may also be helpful. Surgical decompression has been effective in patients with abnormal electroneurographic results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)601-605
Number of pages5
JournalConsultant
Volume43
Issue number5
StatePublished - Apr 15 2003

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Bell Palsy
Herpes Zoster Oticus
Surgical Decompression
Lyme Disease
Facial Paralysis
Recovery of Function
Virus Diseases
Paralysis
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bell's palsy : Update on causes, recognition, management. / Karnath, Bernard.

In: Consultant, Vol. 43, No. 5, 15.04.2003, p. 601-605.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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