Biliary amino acid and glutathione secretion in response to amino acid infusion in the isolated rat liver

Karen Shattuck, C. D. Grinnell, D. K. Rassin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The intravenous infusion of amino acid solutions has been associated with cholestatic liver injury in hospitalized patients and in laboratory animals. In the isolated rat liver, we recently showed that the acute decrease in bile flow, previously reported by other investigators, is dose related, reversible, and associated with dose-related increases in total biliary amino acid concentrations. In the present study, we characterized the effects of graded infusions of amino acid solutions, with and without taurocholate, on biliary secretion of individual amino acids and glutathione, an important regulator of bile flow. Livers from young adult male rats were perfused with an amino acid solution for 1 hour and allowed to recover for 30 minutes. Infusion of the amino acid solution was associated with dose-related increases in biliary concentrations of most amino acids included in the amino acid solution. Infusion of amino acid solutions resulted in a decreased bile/perfusate ratio of most amino acids, which were secreted into bile in amounts approximating their calculated uptake from the infusate. The inclusion of taurocholate in the infusate was associated with lower biliary concentrations of each individual amino acid and significant decreases in biliary total, reduced, and oxidized glutathione. Further investigation of the relationship between these changes in biliary amino acids and glutathione concentrations and the cholestasis associated with infusion of amino acid solutions may provide insights into the mechanism by which amino acids induce such cholestasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-127
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Volume18
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1994

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Glutathione
glutathione
secretion
Amino Acids
liver
amino acids
Liver
rats
bile
Bile
cholestasis
Taurocholic Acid
Cholestasis
dosage
Glutathione Disulfide
Laboratory Animals
young adults
Intravenous Infusions
laboratory animals
Young Adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Biliary amino acid and glutathione secretion in response to amino acid infusion in the isolated rat liver. / Shattuck, Karen; Grinnell, C. D.; Rassin, D. K.

In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Vol. 18, No. 2, 1994, p. 119-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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