Bioethical considerations

Ophra Leyser-Whalen, Erma Lawson, Arlene Macdonald, Jeffrey Temple, John Phelps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The clinical literature notes that pregnancy has become an expected benefit of solid organ transplant. Establishing "best practices" in the management of this particular transplant population requires careful consideration of the ethical dimensions, broadly speaking, of posttransplant pregnancies and these women's lived experiences. In this article, we present the current clinical and social science posttransplant pregnancy research. We specifically address the psychosocial and ethical issues surrounding preconception counseling and posttransplant health quality of life and mothering and suggest areas for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1266-1277
Number of pages12
JournalBest Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Pregnancy
Transplants
Social Sciences
Practice Management
Practice Guidelines
Ethics
Counseling
Quality of Life
Health
Research
Population

Keywords

  • ethics
  • health quality of life
  • organ transplantation
  • pregnancy
  • psychosocial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Bioethical considerations. / Leyser-Whalen, Ophra; Lawson, Erma; Macdonald, Arlene; Temple, Jeffrey; Phelps, John.

In: Best Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vol. 28, No. 8, 01.11.2014, p. 1266-1277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leyser-Whalen, Ophra ; Lawson, Erma ; Macdonald, Arlene ; Temple, Jeffrey ; Phelps, John. / Bioethical considerations. In: Best Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 2014 ; Vol. 28, No. 8. pp. 1266-1277.
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