Blood usage and wastage at an academic teaching hospital before the initial wave of COVID-19 and during and after its quarantine periods

Amber Nguyen, Sarah Burnett-Greenup, Diana Riddle, Janet Enderle, Carol Carman, Rajkumar Rajendran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Transfusion services aim to maintain sufficient blood inventory to support patients, even with challenges introduced by COVID-19. Objectives: To review blood usage and wastage before, during, and after COVID-19 surges, and to evaluate effects on inventory. Methods: In a retrospective review, we evaluated the association between time periods corresponding to the initial wave of COVID-19 (pre–COVID-19, quarantine, and postquarantine) and blood usage/ wastage. Data were stratified by period, and χ2 testing was used to examine the association between these time periods and blood usage/ wastage. Results: In the period before COVID-19, the transfusion service used more units, and in the period after quarantine, more units went to waste. Across all time periods, the most-used product was RBCs, and the most wasted product was plasma. A statistically significant association existed between usage (χ2 [6/3209 (0.2%)]) = 24.534; P ≤.001; Cramer V = 0.62), wastage (χ2 [6/775 (0.8%)]) = 21.673; P = .001; Cramer V = 0.118), and time period. The postquarantine period displayed the highest wastage costs ($51,032.35), compared with the pre–COVID-19 period ($29,734.45). Conclusion: Changes in blood inventory use and waste are significantly associated with the onset and continuation of COVID-19.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-203
Number of pages6
JournalLab Medicine
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2024

Keywords

  • blood banking/transfusion medicine
  • blood product usage
  • blood product wastage
  • cost savings
  • COVID-19
  • quarantine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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