Breast reduction: Safe in the morbidly obese?

Kendall Roehl, E. Stirling Craig, Victoria Gómez, Linda Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: With an increasing obese population, plastic surgeons are consulted by women requesting larger breast reductions, with body mass indices in the obese to morbidly obese range (30 to ≥40 kg/m) and breasts considered gigantomastic (>2000 g resected from each breast). There have been few descriptions of outcomes in the morbidly obese population. Previous literature reports high complication rates in obese women and large-volume breast reductions. METHODS: Retrospective investigation of 179 reduction mammaplasty patients was performed out to determine whether reduction mass, age, body mass index, smoking, method used (i.e., vertical pedicle, inferior pedicle/central mound, or free nipple graft), and comorbidities influenced complication rates. The patients were categorized by size of reduction, age, and body mass index. RESULTS: The overall complication rate was 50 percent. There was no statistical difference in the incidence of complications attributable to size of reduction, age, or body mass index (p = 0.37, p = 0.13, and p = 0.38, respectively). Also, smoking status, method used (p = 0.65 and p = 0.17, and p = 0.48 and p = 0.1, respectively) and comorbidities had no effect on complication rates (reduction size, p = 0.054; age, p = 0.12; and body mass index, p = 0.072). There was no significant increase in the rate of complications for each body mass index group based on the reduction mass (p = 0.75, p = 0.89, p = 0.23, and p = 0.07). CONCLUSION: It is as safe to perform large-volume breast reductions in the morbidly obese patient with comorbidities as in anyone else.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)370-378
Number of pages9
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume122
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008

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Breast
Body Mass Index
Comorbidity
Smoking
Nipples
Mammaplasty
Population
Transplants
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Breast reduction : Safe in the morbidly obese? / Roehl, Kendall; Craig, E. Stirling; Gómez, Victoria; Phillips, Linda.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 122, No. 2, 08.2008, p. 370-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roehl, Kendall ; Craig, E. Stirling ; Gómez, Victoria ; Phillips, Linda. / Breast reduction : Safe in the morbidly obese?. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 122, No. 2. pp. 370-378.
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