Buprenorphine-sustained release alters hemodynamic parameters in a rat burn model

Ashley Guillory, Robert P. Clayton, Anesh Prasai, Jayson Jay, Michael Wetzel, Amina El Ayadi, David Herndon, Celeste Finnerty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: It has been previously shown that anesthesia and analgesia can affect outcomes in the rat burn model and that buprenorphine alleviated pain without drastically altering the outcomes of interest. Recently, the use of a sustained release (SR) formulation of buprenorphine has been promoted over conventional buprenorphine. In this study, we assessed whether buprenorphine-SR altered hemodynamic parameters in our rat model of severe burn injury. Materials and methods: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive either conventional buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg) or buprenorphine-SR (1 mg/kg). Buprenorphine-SR was administered 24 h before the experiment. Buprenorphine was administered on the day of experiment. These groups were further randomized to control or scald burn (60% of total body surface area). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) and heart rate (HR) were measured using a noninvasive blood pressure system before receiving analgesia and after 72 h. Results: As expected, HR was significantly higher after burn injury regardless of analgesic (P <0.0001). Both SBP and DBP were significantly decreased in burned animals receiving conventional buprenorphine (P < 0.0001), but neither was altered in the buprenorphine-SR–treated burned animals. However, SBP, DBP, and HR were significantly increased after 72 h in control animals receiving buprenorphine-SR (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: These data indicate that buprenorphine-SR alters the hemodynamic response to injury and may not be an appropriate choice for a model of severe burn injury. If this analgesic is used, investigators must cautiously form conclusions, especially in experimental conditions that would be expected to alter cardiac hemodynamics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-159
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume232
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Buprenorphine
Hemodynamics
Heart Rate
Wounds and Injuries
Blood Pressure
Analgesics
Anesthesia and Analgesia
Body Surface Area
Analgesia
Sprague Dawley Rats

Keywords

  • Analgesia
  • Blood pressure
  • Cytokines
  • Heart rate
  • Pain management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Buprenorphine-sustained release alters hemodynamic parameters in a rat burn model. / Guillory, Ashley; Clayton, Robert P.; Prasai, Anesh; Jay, Jayson; Wetzel, Michael; El Ayadi, Amina; Herndon, David; Finnerty, Celeste.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 232, 01.12.2018, p. 154-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: It has been previously shown that anesthesia and analgesia can affect outcomes in the rat burn model and that buprenorphine alleviated pain without drastically altering the outcomes of interest. Recently, the use of a sustained release (SR) formulation of buprenorphine has been promoted over conventional buprenorphine. In this study, we assessed whether buprenorphine-SR altered hemodynamic parameters in our rat model of severe burn injury. Materials and methods: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive either conventional buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg) or buprenorphine-SR (1 mg/kg). Buprenorphine-SR was administered 24 h before the experiment. Buprenorphine was administered on the day of experiment. These groups were further randomized to control or scald burn (60{\%} of total body surface area). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) and heart rate (HR) were measured using a noninvasive blood pressure system before receiving analgesia and after 72 h. Results: As expected, HR was significantly higher after burn injury regardless of analgesic (P <0.0001). Both SBP and DBP were significantly decreased in burned animals receiving conventional buprenorphine (P < 0.0001), but neither was altered in the buprenorphine-SR–treated burned animals. However, SBP, DBP, and HR were significantly increased after 72 h in control animals receiving buprenorphine-SR (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: These data indicate that buprenorphine-SR alters the hemodynamic response to injury and may not be an appropriate choice for a model of severe burn injury. If this analgesic is used, investigators must cautiously form conclusions, especially in experimental conditions that would be expected to alter cardiac hemodynamics.",
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AU - Clayton, Robert P.

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AU - Wetzel, Michael

AU - El Ayadi, Amina

AU - Herndon, David

AU - Finnerty, Celeste

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