Burn injury associated with home oxygen use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To quantify the risk of burn injury associated with home oxygen use and to examine the risk factors associated with the development of this injury. Patients and Methods We used a nested case-control and a retrospective cohort design to study enrollment and claims data from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries 66 years and older with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) from January 1, 2001, through December 31, 2010. The primary outcome was burn injury in patients with COPD prescribed home oxygen. Results In the nested case-control method, patients with burn injury were twice (odds ratio, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.57-3.78) as likely to be prescribed oxygen in the preceding 90 days compared with those without burn injury. In the retrospective cohort study, the absolute risk of burn injury in patients prescribed oxygen therapy was 2.98 per 1000 patients compared with 1.69 per 1000 patients not prescribed oxygen during a 22-month period. The excess risk of a burn injury associated with oxygen was 0.704 per 1000 patients per year, and the number needed to harm was 1421. In multivariable analysis, factors associated with burn injury included male sex, low socioeconomic status, oxygen therapy use, and the presence of 3 or more comorbidities. Conclusion The benefits of oxygen therapy in patients with COPD outweigh the modest risk of burn injury associated with home oxygen use. However, with the increasing number of patients being prescribed oxygen, health care professionals must educate and counsel patients regarding the potential risk of burn injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)492-499
Number of pages8
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume90
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Oxygen
Wounds and Injuries
Medicare
Social Class
Comorbidity
Cohort Studies
Therapeutics
Retrospective Studies
Odds Ratio
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Burn injury associated with home oxygen use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. / Sharma, Gulshan; Meena, Ragai; Goodwin, James; Zhang, Wei; Kuo, Yong Fang; Duarte, Alexander.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 90, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 492-499.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{dfb2bf728883453e9a5cf4d40ffca59c,
title = "Burn injury associated with home oxygen use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease",
abstract = "Objectives To quantify the risk of burn injury associated with home oxygen use and to examine the risk factors associated with the development of this injury. Patients and Methods We used a nested case-control and a retrospective cohort design to study enrollment and claims data from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries 66 years and older with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) from January 1, 2001, through December 31, 2010. The primary outcome was burn injury in patients with COPD prescribed home oxygen. Results In the nested case-control method, patients with burn injury were twice (odds ratio, 2.43; 95{\%} CI, 1.57-3.78) as likely to be prescribed oxygen in the preceding 90 days compared with those without burn injury. In the retrospective cohort study, the absolute risk of burn injury in patients prescribed oxygen therapy was 2.98 per 1000 patients compared with 1.69 per 1000 patients not prescribed oxygen during a 22-month period. The excess risk of a burn injury associated with oxygen was 0.704 per 1000 patients per year, and the number needed to harm was 1421. In multivariable analysis, factors associated with burn injury included male sex, low socioeconomic status, oxygen therapy use, and the presence of 3 or more comorbidities. Conclusion The benefits of oxygen therapy in patients with COPD outweigh the modest risk of burn injury associated with home oxygen use. However, with the increasing number of patients being prescribed oxygen, health care professionals must educate and counsel patients regarding the potential risk of burn injury.",
author = "Gulshan Sharma and Ragai Meena and James Goodwin and Wei Zhang and Kuo, {Yong Fang} and Alexander Duarte",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.mayocp.2014.12.024",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "90",
pages = "492--499",
journal = "Mayo Clinic Proceedings",
issn = "0025-6196",
publisher = "Elsevier Science",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Burn injury associated with home oxygen use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

AU - Sharma, Gulshan

AU - Meena, Ragai

AU - Goodwin, James

AU - Zhang, Wei

AU - Kuo, Yong Fang

AU - Duarte, Alexander

PY - 2015/4/1

Y1 - 2015/4/1

N2 - Objectives To quantify the risk of burn injury associated with home oxygen use and to examine the risk factors associated with the development of this injury. Patients and Methods We used a nested case-control and a retrospective cohort design to study enrollment and claims data from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries 66 years and older with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) from January 1, 2001, through December 31, 2010. The primary outcome was burn injury in patients with COPD prescribed home oxygen. Results In the nested case-control method, patients with burn injury were twice (odds ratio, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.57-3.78) as likely to be prescribed oxygen in the preceding 90 days compared with those without burn injury. In the retrospective cohort study, the absolute risk of burn injury in patients prescribed oxygen therapy was 2.98 per 1000 patients compared with 1.69 per 1000 patients not prescribed oxygen during a 22-month period. The excess risk of a burn injury associated with oxygen was 0.704 per 1000 patients per year, and the number needed to harm was 1421. In multivariable analysis, factors associated with burn injury included male sex, low socioeconomic status, oxygen therapy use, and the presence of 3 or more comorbidities. Conclusion The benefits of oxygen therapy in patients with COPD outweigh the modest risk of burn injury associated with home oxygen use. However, with the increasing number of patients being prescribed oxygen, health care professionals must educate and counsel patients regarding the potential risk of burn injury.

AB - Objectives To quantify the risk of burn injury associated with home oxygen use and to examine the risk factors associated with the development of this injury. Patients and Methods We used a nested case-control and a retrospective cohort design to study enrollment and claims data from a national sample of Medicare beneficiaries 66 years and older with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) from January 1, 2001, through December 31, 2010. The primary outcome was burn injury in patients with COPD prescribed home oxygen. Results In the nested case-control method, patients with burn injury were twice (odds ratio, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.57-3.78) as likely to be prescribed oxygen in the preceding 90 days compared with those without burn injury. In the retrospective cohort study, the absolute risk of burn injury in patients prescribed oxygen therapy was 2.98 per 1000 patients compared with 1.69 per 1000 patients not prescribed oxygen during a 22-month period. The excess risk of a burn injury associated with oxygen was 0.704 per 1000 patients per year, and the number needed to harm was 1421. In multivariable analysis, factors associated with burn injury included male sex, low socioeconomic status, oxygen therapy use, and the presence of 3 or more comorbidities. Conclusion The benefits of oxygen therapy in patients with COPD outweigh the modest risk of burn injury associated with home oxygen use. However, with the increasing number of patients being prescribed oxygen, health care professionals must educate and counsel patients regarding the potential risk of burn injury.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84926408517&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84926408517&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.mayocp.2014.12.024

DO - 10.1016/j.mayocp.2014.12.024

M3 - Article

C2 - 25837866

AN - SCOPUS:84926408517

VL - 90

SP - 492

EP - 499

JO - Mayo Clinic Proceedings

JF - Mayo Clinic Proceedings

SN - 0025-6196

IS - 4

ER -