C57BL/6 life span study: Age-related declines in muscle power production and contractile velocity

Theodore Graber, Jong Hee Kim, Robert W. Grange, Linda K. McLoon, LaDora V. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Quantification of key outcome measures in animal models of aging is an important step preceding intervention testing. One such measurement, skeletal muscle power generation (force * velocity), is critical for dynamic movement. Prior research focused on maximum power (Pmax), which occurs around 30–40 % of maximum load. However, movement occurs over the entire load range. Thus, the primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age on power generation during concentric contractions in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles over the load range from 10 to 90 % of peak isometric tetanic force (P0). Adult, old, and elderly male C57BL/6 mice were examined for contractile function (6–7 months old, 100 % survival; ~24 months, 75 %; and ~28 months, max but also over the load range. Importantly, we found greater age-associated deficits in both power and velocity when the muscles were contracting concentrically against heavy loads (>50 % P0). The shape of the force-velocity curve also changed with age (a/P0 increased). In addition, there were prolonged contraction times to maximum force and shifts in the distribution of the myosin light and heavy chain isoforms in the EDL. The results demonstrate that age-associated difficulty in movement during challenging tasks is likely due, in addition to overall reduced force output, to an accelerated deterioration of power production and contractile velocity under heavily loaded conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number36
JournalAge
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 17 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Skeletal Muscle
Muscles
Myosin Light Chains
Myosin Heavy Chains
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Protein Isoforms
Animal Models
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research

Keywords

  • Contractile physiology
  • Mice
  • Muscle
  • Power
  • Sarcopenia
  • Velocity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Graber, T., Kim, J. H., Grange, R. W., McLoon, L. K., & Thompson, L. V. (2015). C57BL/6 life span study: Age-related declines in muscle power production and contractile velocity. Age, 37(3), [36]. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11357-015-9773-1

C57BL/6 life span study : Age-related declines in muscle power production and contractile velocity. / Graber, Theodore; Kim, Jong Hee; Grange, Robert W.; McLoon, Linda K.; Thompson, LaDora V.

In: Age, Vol. 37, No. 3, 36, 17.04.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Graber, Theodore ; Kim, Jong Hee ; Grange, Robert W. ; McLoon, Linda K. ; Thompson, LaDora V. / C57BL/6 life span study : Age-related declines in muscle power production and contractile velocity. In: Age. 2015 ; Vol. 37, No. 3.
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