Capillary electrophoresis and the clinical laboratory

Rukhsana Jabeen, Deborah Payne, John Wiktorowicz, Amin Mohammad, John Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

Over the past 15 years, CE as an analytical tool has shown great promise in replacing many conventional clinical laboratory methods, such as electrophoresis and HPLC. CE's appeal was that it was fast, used very small amounts of sample and reagents, was extremely versatile, and was able to separate large and small analytes, whether neutral or charged. Because of this versatility, numerous methods have been developed for analytes that are of clinical interest. Other than molecular diagnostic and forensic laboratories CE has not been able to make a major impact in the United States. In contrast, in Europe and Japan an increasing number of clinical laboratories are using CE. Now that automated multicapillary instruments are commercially available along with cost-effective test kits, CE may yet be accepted as an instrument that will be routinely used in the clinical laboratories. This review will focus on areas where CE has the potential to have the greatest impact on the clinical laboratory. These include analyses of proteins found in serum and urine, hemoglobin (A1c and variants), carbohydrate-deficient transferrin, forensic and therapeutic drug screening, and molecular diagnostics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2413-2438
Number of pages26
JournalELECTROPHORESIS
Volume27
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

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Keywords

  • Capillary electrophoresis
  • Clinical applications
  • Clinical laboratory
  • Molecular diagnostics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Jabeen, R., Payne, D., Wiktorowicz, J., Mohammad, A., & Petersen, J. (2006). Capillary electrophoresis and the clinical laboratory. ELECTROPHORESIS, 27(12), 2413-2438. https://doi.org/10.1002/elps.200500948