Cell control by membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

304 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rates of mechanochemical processes, such as endocytosis, membrane extension and membrane resealing after cell wounding, are known to be controlled biochemically, through interaction with regulatory proteins. Here, I propose that these rates are also controlled physically, through an apparently continuous adhesion between plasma membrane lipids and cytoskeletal proteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)392-396
Number of pages5
JournalNature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology
Volume2
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cytoskeleton
Cell Membrane
Cytoskeletal Proteins
Membranes
Membrane Lipids
Endocytosis
Blood Proteins
Membrane Proteins
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Cell control by membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion. / Sheetz, Michael.

In: Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology, Vol. 2, No. 5, 01.05.2001, p. 392-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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