Cerebral 2-deoxyglucose uptake in rats during ethanol withdrawal and postwithdrawal

Michael J. Eckardt, Gerald Campbell, Cheryl A. Marietta, Edward Majchrowicz, Henry N. Wixon, Forrest F. Weight

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The overt ethanol withdrawal syndrome is associated with a generalized increase in cerebral uptake of 2-deoxyglucose. Relatively high elevations of 2-deoxyglucose were observed in many structures associated with motor function, the mamillary body-anterior thalamus-cingulate cortex pathway, many thalamic nuclei, and the raphe. Overtly withdrawing rats had higher levels of 2-deoxyglucose than postwithdrawing animals that had been abstinent for 1-5 weeks in 96% of the gray areas evaluated. Postwithdrawal was associated with increased amounts of 2-deoxyglucose in comparison to controls in 80% of the gray areas evaluated. Postwithdrawal and control rats did not differ in some areas involved with motor function and some limbic structures, such as the mamillary body-anterior thalamus-cingulate cortex pathway. It is concluded that the ethanol-withdrawal syndrome results in alterations in cerebral physiology, some of which persist for at least 5 weeks postwithdrawal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Research
Volume366
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 26 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Deoxyglucose
Ethanol
Mammillary Bodies
Anterior Thalamic Nuclei
Gyrus Cinguli
Thalamic Nuclei

Keywords

  • 2-deoxyglucose
  • ethanol withdrawal syndrome
  • postwithdrawal recovery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Eckardt, M. J., Campbell, G., Marietta, C. A., Majchrowicz, E., Wixon, H. N., & Weight, F. F. (1986). Cerebral 2-deoxyglucose uptake in rats during ethanol withdrawal and postwithdrawal. Brain Research, 366(1-2), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-8993(86)91276-X

Cerebral 2-deoxyglucose uptake in rats during ethanol withdrawal and postwithdrawal. / Eckardt, Michael J.; Campbell, Gerald; Marietta, Cheryl A.; Majchrowicz, Edward; Wixon, Henry N.; Weight, Forrest F.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 366, No. 1-2, 26.02.1986, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eckardt, MJ, Campbell, G, Marietta, CA, Majchrowicz, E, Wixon, HN & Weight, FF 1986, 'Cerebral 2-deoxyglucose uptake in rats during ethanol withdrawal and postwithdrawal', Brain Research, vol. 366, no. 1-2, pp. 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-8993(86)91276-X
Eckardt, Michael J. ; Campbell, Gerald ; Marietta, Cheryl A. ; Majchrowicz, Edward ; Wixon, Henry N. ; Weight, Forrest F. / Cerebral 2-deoxyglucose uptake in rats during ethanol withdrawal and postwithdrawal. In: Brain Research. 1986 ; Vol. 366, No. 1-2. pp. 1-9.
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