Cerebral blood flow during experimental endotoxemia in volunteers

Valerie Pollard, Donald Prough, Donald J. Deyo, Brendan Conroy, Tatsuo Uchida, Andrea Daye, Lillian D. Traber, Daniel L. Traber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To measure cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen, cerebral oxygen delivery, and cerebral vascular resistance during experimental endotoxemia in volunteers. Design: Experimental, prospective study. Setting: University general clinical research center. Subjects: Healthy volunteers (six male, four female, 30.1 ± 1.9 yrs of age). Interventions: Volunteers had redial, pulmonary arterial, and jugular venous bulb catheters inserted. All VOlUnteers received a bolus of Escherichia coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg). Cerebral blood flow was measured, using the Kety- Schmidt technique. Measurements and Main Results: Cerebral and systemic hemodynamics end oxygenation variables were measured at baseline and hourly for 5 hrs after endotoxin administration. A systemic hyperdynamic response characterized by an increase in body temperature (97.9 ± 0.02, 100.2 ± 0.02, and 99.7 ± 0.02°F [36.8 ± 0.01, 37.9 ± 0.1, and 37.6 ± 0.1°C] at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs, respectively), cardiac index (3.7 ± 0.2, 6.2 ± 0.2, and 5.7 ± 0.2 L/min/m2 at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and heart rate (70 ± 2.6, 96 ± 2.6, and 93 ± 2.9 beats/ rain at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and e decrease in mean arterial pressure (99.3 ± 2.2, 84.4 ± 2.8, and 84 ± 3.4 mm Hg at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) and systemic vascular resistance (1498 ± 53, 786 ± 37, 849 ± 36 dyne·sec/cm5·m2 at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) followed the endotoxin bolus. Cerebral blood flow (65.4 ± 4.3, 57.7 ± 3.1, and 5866 ± 3.0 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), cerebral oxygen delivery (11.8 ± 0.7, 9.8 ± 0.6, and 9.5 ± 0.6 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (3.8 ± 0.4, 3.3 ± 0.3, and 3.0 ± 03 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and cerebral vascular resistance (1.4 ± 0.2, 1.4 ± 0.2, and 1.3 ± 0.2 mm Hg/mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) were unchanged throughout the 5-hr study period. Signs of cerebral dysfunction were not apparent, although the volunteers appeared drowsy during the latter part of the study. Conclusion: A dose of endotoxin sufficient to induce systemic vasodilation in healthy subjects does not influence cerebral blood flow or the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1700-1706
Number of pages7
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Endotoxemia
Volunteers
Oxygen
Endotoxins
Vascular Resistance
Healthy Volunteers
Rain
Body Temperature
Vasodilation
Arterial Pressure
Research Design
Neck
Catheters
Heart Rate
Hemodynamics
Prospective Studies
Lung
Research

Keywords

  • Cerebral autoregulation
  • Cerebral blood flow
  • Cerebral metabolic oxygen consumption
  • Endotoxin
  • Human
  • Sepsis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Pollard, V., Prough, D., Deyo, D. J., Conroy, B., Uchida, T., Daye, A., ... Traber, D. L. (1997). Cerebral blood flow during experimental endotoxemia in volunteers. Critical Care Medicine, 25(10), 1700-1706. https://doi.org/10.1097/00003246-199710000-00020

Cerebral blood flow during experimental endotoxemia in volunteers. / Pollard, Valerie; Prough, Donald; Deyo, Donald J.; Conroy, Brendan; Uchida, Tatsuo; Daye, Andrea; Traber, Lillian D.; Traber, Daniel L.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 10, 1997, p. 1700-1706.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pollard, V, Prough, D, Deyo, DJ, Conroy, B, Uchida, T, Daye, A, Traber, LD & Traber, DL 1997, 'Cerebral blood flow during experimental endotoxemia in volunteers', Critical Care Medicine, vol. 25, no. 10, pp. 1700-1706. https://doi.org/10.1097/00003246-199710000-00020
Pollard, Valerie ; Prough, Donald ; Deyo, Donald J. ; Conroy, Brendan ; Uchida, Tatsuo ; Daye, Andrea ; Traber, Lillian D. ; Traber, Daniel L. / Cerebral blood flow during experimental endotoxemia in volunteers. In: Critical Care Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 25, No. 10. pp. 1700-1706.
@article{4e60f7be1be847aeb360140379445022,
title = "Cerebral blood flow during experimental endotoxemia in volunteers",
abstract = "Objective: To measure cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen, cerebral oxygen delivery, and cerebral vascular resistance during experimental endotoxemia in volunteers. Design: Experimental, prospective study. Setting: University general clinical research center. Subjects: Healthy volunteers (six male, four female, 30.1 ± 1.9 yrs of age). Interventions: Volunteers had redial, pulmonary arterial, and jugular venous bulb catheters inserted. All VOlUnteers received a bolus of Escherichia coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg). Cerebral blood flow was measured, using the Kety- Schmidt technique. Measurements and Main Results: Cerebral and systemic hemodynamics end oxygenation variables were measured at baseline and hourly for 5 hrs after endotoxin administration. A systemic hyperdynamic response characterized by an increase in body temperature (97.9 ± 0.02, 100.2 ± 0.02, and 99.7 ± 0.02°F [36.8 ± 0.01, 37.9 ± 0.1, and 37.6 ± 0.1°C] at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs, respectively), cardiac index (3.7 ± 0.2, 6.2 ± 0.2, and 5.7 ± 0.2 L/min/m2 at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and heart rate (70 ± 2.6, 96 ± 2.6, and 93 ± 2.9 beats/ rain at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and e decrease in mean arterial pressure (99.3 ± 2.2, 84.4 ± 2.8, and 84 ± 3.4 mm Hg at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) and systemic vascular resistance (1498 ± 53, 786 ± 37, 849 ± 36 dyne·sec/cm5·m2 at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) followed the endotoxin bolus. Cerebral blood flow (65.4 ± 4.3, 57.7 ± 3.1, and 5866 ± 3.0 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), cerebral oxygen delivery (11.8 ± 0.7, 9.8 ± 0.6, and 9.5 ± 0.6 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (3.8 ± 0.4, 3.3 ± 0.3, and 3.0 ± 03 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and cerebral vascular resistance (1.4 ± 0.2, 1.4 ± 0.2, and 1.3 ± 0.2 mm Hg/mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) were unchanged throughout the 5-hr study period. Signs of cerebral dysfunction were not apparent, although the volunteers appeared drowsy during the latter part of the study. Conclusion: A dose of endotoxin sufficient to induce systemic vasodilation in healthy subjects does not influence cerebral blood flow or the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.",
keywords = "Cerebral autoregulation, Cerebral blood flow, Cerebral metabolic oxygen consumption, Endotoxin, Human, Sepsis",
author = "Valerie Pollard and Donald Prough and Deyo, {Donald J.} and Brendan Conroy and Tatsuo Uchida and Andrea Daye and Traber, {Lillian D.} and Traber, {Daniel L.}",
year = "1997",
doi = "10.1097/00003246-199710000-00020",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "1700--1706",
journal = "Critical Care Medicine",
issn = "0090-3493",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cerebral blood flow during experimental endotoxemia in volunteers

AU - Pollard, Valerie

AU - Prough, Donald

AU - Deyo, Donald J.

AU - Conroy, Brendan

AU - Uchida, Tatsuo

AU - Daye, Andrea

AU - Traber, Lillian D.

AU - Traber, Daniel L.

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - Objective: To measure cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen, cerebral oxygen delivery, and cerebral vascular resistance during experimental endotoxemia in volunteers. Design: Experimental, prospective study. Setting: University general clinical research center. Subjects: Healthy volunteers (six male, four female, 30.1 ± 1.9 yrs of age). Interventions: Volunteers had redial, pulmonary arterial, and jugular venous bulb catheters inserted. All VOlUnteers received a bolus of Escherichia coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg). Cerebral blood flow was measured, using the Kety- Schmidt technique. Measurements and Main Results: Cerebral and systemic hemodynamics end oxygenation variables were measured at baseline and hourly for 5 hrs after endotoxin administration. A systemic hyperdynamic response characterized by an increase in body temperature (97.9 ± 0.02, 100.2 ± 0.02, and 99.7 ± 0.02°F [36.8 ± 0.01, 37.9 ± 0.1, and 37.6 ± 0.1°C] at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs, respectively), cardiac index (3.7 ± 0.2, 6.2 ± 0.2, and 5.7 ± 0.2 L/min/m2 at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and heart rate (70 ± 2.6, 96 ± 2.6, and 93 ± 2.9 beats/ rain at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and e decrease in mean arterial pressure (99.3 ± 2.2, 84.4 ± 2.8, and 84 ± 3.4 mm Hg at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) and systemic vascular resistance (1498 ± 53, 786 ± 37, 849 ± 36 dyne·sec/cm5·m2 at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) followed the endotoxin bolus. Cerebral blood flow (65.4 ± 4.3, 57.7 ± 3.1, and 5866 ± 3.0 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), cerebral oxygen delivery (11.8 ± 0.7, 9.8 ± 0.6, and 9.5 ± 0.6 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (3.8 ± 0.4, 3.3 ± 0.3, and 3.0 ± 03 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and cerebral vascular resistance (1.4 ± 0.2, 1.4 ± 0.2, and 1.3 ± 0.2 mm Hg/mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) were unchanged throughout the 5-hr study period. Signs of cerebral dysfunction were not apparent, although the volunteers appeared drowsy during the latter part of the study. Conclusion: A dose of endotoxin sufficient to induce systemic vasodilation in healthy subjects does not influence cerebral blood flow or the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.

AB - Objective: To measure cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen, cerebral oxygen delivery, and cerebral vascular resistance during experimental endotoxemia in volunteers. Design: Experimental, prospective study. Setting: University general clinical research center. Subjects: Healthy volunteers (six male, four female, 30.1 ± 1.9 yrs of age). Interventions: Volunteers had redial, pulmonary arterial, and jugular venous bulb catheters inserted. All VOlUnteers received a bolus of Escherichia coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg). Cerebral blood flow was measured, using the Kety- Schmidt technique. Measurements and Main Results: Cerebral and systemic hemodynamics end oxygenation variables were measured at baseline and hourly for 5 hrs after endotoxin administration. A systemic hyperdynamic response characterized by an increase in body temperature (97.9 ± 0.02, 100.2 ± 0.02, and 99.7 ± 0.02°F [36.8 ± 0.01, 37.9 ± 0.1, and 37.6 ± 0.1°C] at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs, respectively), cardiac index (3.7 ± 0.2, 6.2 ± 0.2, and 5.7 ± 0.2 L/min/m2 at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and heart rate (70 ± 2.6, 96 ± 2.6, and 93 ± 2.9 beats/ rain at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and e decrease in mean arterial pressure (99.3 ± 2.2, 84.4 ± 2.8, and 84 ± 3.4 mm Hg at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) and systemic vascular resistance (1498 ± 53, 786 ± 37, 849 ± 36 dyne·sec/cm5·m2 at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) followed the endotoxin bolus. Cerebral blood flow (65.4 ± 4.3, 57.7 ± 3.1, and 5866 ± 3.0 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), cerebral oxygen delivery (11.8 ± 0.7, 9.8 ± 0.6, and 9.5 ± 0.6 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (3.8 ± 0.4, 3.3 ± 0.3, and 3.0 ± 03 mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs), and cerebral vascular resistance (1.4 ± 0.2, 1.4 ± 0.2, and 1.3 ± 0.2 mm Hg/mL/100 g/min at baseline, 3, and 5 hrs) were unchanged throughout the 5-hr study period. Signs of cerebral dysfunction were not apparent, although the volunteers appeared drowsy during the latter part of the study. Conclusion: A dose of endotoxin sufficient to induce systemic vasodilation in healthy subjects does not influence cerebral blood flow or the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.

KW - Cerebral autoregulation

KW - Cerebral blood flow

KW - Cerebral metabolic oxygen consumption

KW - Endotoxin

KW - Human

KW - Sepsis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030756558&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030756558&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00003246-199710000-00020

DO - 10.1097/00003246-199710000-00020

M3 - Article

C2 - 9377885

AN - SCOPUS:0030756558

VL - 25

SP - 1700

EP - 1706

JO - Critical Care Medicine

JF - Critical Care Medicine

SN - 0090-3493

IS - 10

ER -