Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological consequences of chronic cocaine use

T. L. Strickland, I. Mena, Javier Villanueva-Meyer, B. L. Miller, J. Cummings, C. M. Mehringer, P. Satz, H. Myers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

208 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research indicates that cocaine significantly constricts the cerebral vasculature and can lead to ischemic brain infarction. Long-term effects of intermittent or casual cocaine use in patients without symptoms of stroke or transient ischemic attack were investigated. Single-photon emission computed tomography with xenon-133 and [99mTc]hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime, magnetic resonance imaging, and selected neuropsychological measures were used to study cerebral perfusion, brain morphology, and cognitive functioning. Patients were drug free for at least 6 months before evaluation. All showed regions of significant cerebral hypoperfusion in the frontal, periventricular, and/or temporal-parietal areas. Deficits in attention, concentration, new learning, visual and verbal memory, word production, and visuomotor integration were observed. This study indicates that long-term cocaine use may produce sustained brain perfusion deficits and persistent neuropsychological compromise in some subgroups of cocaine-abusing patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-427
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cocaine
Perfusion
Brain Infarction
Verbal Learning
Xenon
Transient Ischemic Attack
Brain
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Stroke
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Strickland, T. L., Mena, I., Villanueva-Meyer, J., Miller, B. L., Cummings, J., Mehringer, C. M., ... Myers, H. (1993). Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological consequences of chronic cocaine use. Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 5(4), 419-427. https://doi.org/10.1176/jnp.5.4.419

Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological consequences of chronic cocaine use. / Strickland, T. L.; Mena, I.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Miller, B. L.; Cummings, J.; Mehringer, C. M.; Satz, P.; Myers, H.

In: Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.01.1993, p. 419-427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strickland, TL, Mena, I, Villanueva-Meyer, J, Miller, BL, Cummings, J, Mehringer, CM, Satz, P & Myers, H 1993, 'Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological consequences of chronic cocaine use', Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 419-427. https://doi.org/10.1176/jnp.5.4.419
Strickland TL, Mena I, Villanueva-Meyer J, Miller BL, Cummings J, Mehringer CM et al. Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological consequences of chronic cocaine use. Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences. 1993 Jan 1;5(4):419-427. https://doi.org/10.1176/jnp.5.4.419
Strickland, T. L. ; Mena, I. ; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier ; Miller, B. L. ; Cummings, J. ; Mehringer, C. M. ; Satz, P. ; Myers, H. / Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological consequences of chronic cocaine use. In: Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences. 1993 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 419-427.
@article{2c356d2b61af4019ae9e1fc7516a6030,
title = "Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological consequences of chronic cocaine use",
abstract = "Research indicates that cocaine significantly constricts the cerebral vasculature and can lead to ischemic brain infarction. Long-term effects of intermittent or casual cocaine use in patients without symptoms of stroke or transient ischemic attack were investigated. Single-photon emission computed tomography with xenon-133 and [99mTc]hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime, magnetic resonance imaging, and selected neuropsychological measures were used to study cerebral perfusion, brain morphology, and cognitive functioning. Patients were drug free for at least 6 months before evaluation. All showed regions of significant cerebral hypoperfusion in the frontal, periventricular, and/or temporal-parietal areas. Deficits in attention, concentration, new learning, visual and verbal memory, word production, and visuomotor integration were observed. This study indicates that long-term cocaine use may produce sustained brain perfusion deficits and persistent neuropsychological compromise in some subgroups of cocaine-abusing patients.",
author = "Strickland, {T. L.} and I. Mena and Javier Villanueva-Meyer and Miller, {B. L.} and J. Cummings and Mehringer, {C. M.} and P. Satz and H. Myers",
year = "1993",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1176/jnp.5.4.419",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "419--427",
journal = "Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences",
issn = "0895-0172",
publisher = "American Psychiatric Publishing Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological consequences of chronic cocaine use

AU - Strickland, T. L.

AU - Mena, I.

AU - Villanueva-Meyer, Javier

AU - Miller, B. L.

AU - Cummings, J.

AU - Mehringer, C. M.

AU - Satz, P.

AU - Myers, H.

PY - 1993/1/1

Y1 - 1993/1/1

N2 - Research indicates that cocaine significantly constricts the cerebral vasculature and can lead to ischemic brain infarction. Long-term effects of intermittent or casual cocaine use in patients without symptoms of stroke or transient ischemic attack were investigated. Single-photon emission computed tomography with xenon-133 and [99mTc]hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime, magnetic resonance imaging, and selected neuropsychological measures were used to study cerebral perfusion, brain morphology, and cognitive functioning. Patients were drug free for at least 6 months before evaluation. All showed regions of significant cerebral hypoperfusion in the frontal, periventricular, and/or temporal-parietal areas. Deficits in attention, concentration, new learning, visual and verbal memory, word production, and visuomotor integration were observed. This study indicates that long-term cocaine use may produce sustained brain perfusion deficits and persistent neuropsychological compromise in some subgroups of cocaine-abusing patients.

AB - Research indicates that cocaine significantly constricts the cerebral vasculature and can lead to ischemic brain infarction. Long-term effects of intermittent or casual cocaine use in patients without symptoms of stroke or transient ischemic attack were investigated. Single-photon emission computed tomography with xenon-133 and [99mTc]hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime, magnetic resonance imaging, and selected neuropsychological measures were used to study cerebral perfusion, brain morphology, and cognitive functioning. Patients were drug free for at least 6 months before evaluation. All showed regions of significant cerebral hypoperfusion in the frontal, periventricular, and/or temporal-parietal areas. Deficits in attention, concentration, new learning, visual and verbal memory, word production, and visuomotor integration were observed. This study indicates that long-term cocaine use may produce sustained brain perfusion deficits and persistent neuropsychological compromise in some subgroups of cocaine-abusing patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027379302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027379302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1176/jnp.5.4.419

DO - 10.1176/jnp.5.4.419

M3 - Article

C2 - 8286941

AN - SCOPUS:0027379302

VL - 5

SP - 419

EP - 427

JO - Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences

JF - Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences

SN - 0895-0172

IS - 4

ER -