Cerebrovascular effects of small volume resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock: Comparison of hypertonic saline and concentrated hydroxyethyl starch in dogs

Donald Prough, D. S. Prough, C. L. Taylor, D. D. Deal, D. S. DeWitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine if hypertonic and hyperoncotic resuscitation solutions exerted comparable effects on cerebral hemodynamics following hemorrhagic shock, we compared randomly assigned, equal volumes (6.0 ml/kg) of hypertonic (7.2%) saline (HS) and hyperoncotic (20%) hydroxyethyl starch (HES) for resuscitation from acute experimental hemorrhage in 12 anesthetized dogs. Regional cerebral blood flow (radiolabeled microspheres), intracranial pressure (cisternal catheter), and systemic hemodynamics were recorded. Rapid hemorrhage reduced the mean arterial pressure to 45 mm Hg for 30 min. Resuscitation fluids were infused over 5 min. Both fluids restored mean arterial pressure and cardiac output equally. However, at 60 min following resuscitation, cardiac output decreased in the HS group in comparison to the HES group (1.7 ± 0.1 vs. 3.1 ± 0.2 L/min, p < 0.05). Cardiac output rapidly declined, however, in the HS group in comparison to the HES group (p < 0.05 60 min following resuscitation). Intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure were similar at all intervals. Regional cerebral blood flow was similar following both fluids. Neither fluid restored cerebral oxygen transport to baseline values. Based on these data, the authors conclude that, following severe hemorrhagic shock of brief duration, systemic and cerebral hemodynamic values are restored equally well by highly concentrated colloid or by hypertonic saline, although hypertonic saline only transiently improves cardiac output.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-55
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology
Volume3
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Hemorrhagic Shock
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Resuscitation
Starch
Cardiac Output
Dogs
Hemodynamics
Regional Blood Flow
Intracranial Pressure
Arterial Pressure
Hemorrhage
Colloids
Microspheres
Catheters
Oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Cerebrovascular effects of small volume resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock : Comparison of hypertonic saline and concentrated hydroxyethyl starch in dogs. / Prough, Donald; Prough, D. S.; Taylor, C. L.; Deal, D. D.; DeWitt, D. S.

In: Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology, Vol. 3, No. 1, 1991, p. 47-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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