Changes in pediatric residents' perceptions of their continuity experience during their training: A national study

Susan Feigelman, John Olsson, Jan Drutz, Claibourne I. Dungy, Joseph Lopreiato, Janet R. Serwint, Alan J. Meltzer, Karin Hillenbrand, Debra Bogen, Robert R. Tanz, Rachel Monn, Paula Algranati, Diane Kittredge, Daniel Vijjeswarapu, William J. Riley, Lawrence Pasquinelli, Jill Mazurek, Sharon Reisen, Theodore Sectish, Henry A. SchaefferKeith Derco, Gregory Blaschke, Theresea Hetzler, Arthur Jaffe, Beth Volin, Thomas M. Ball, Marilyn Dumont-Driscoll, Lisa Campbell, Rebecca Collins, John N. Walburn, Sharon Dabrow, Michelle S. Barratt, Laura E. Ferguson, Patricia Beach, Wendy Davis, Ariane May, Gale Cantor, Catherine Kelly, Brian Forsyth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. - To determine how pediatric residents' perceptions of continuity clinic experiences vary by level of training, after controlling for the effect of continuity setting. Method. - Cross-sectional survey of pediatric and combined pediatric trainees in US residency programs. Results. - Survey responses were received from 1355 residents in 36 training programs. Residents' continuity experiences were in hospital-based and community settings. Numbers of patients seen increased between PGY-1 and PGY-3 years, but not in the PGY-4 and PGY-5 years. Compared to PGY-1 residents, PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents were more likely to report more encounters with established patients, but were not more likely to feel like the primary care provider. There were no significant differences by training level in terms of involvement in panel patient's laboratory results, hospitalizations, or telephone calls, although nursery involvement decreased with increasing training level. Autonomy was directly related to training level. The perception of having the appropriate amount of exposure to practice management issues was low for all respondents. Conclusions. - Residents perceived that they had greater autonomy and continuity with patients as they become more senior, yet they were not more likely to feel like the primary care provider. Lack of increased involvement in key patient care and office responsibilities across training years may reflect a need for changes in resident education. These data may be helpful in formulating recommendations to program directors with regard to determining which Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies should be emphasized and evaluated in the continuity experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-227
Number of pages7
JournalAmbulatory Pediatrics
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

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Pediatrics
Primary Health Care
Graduate Medical Education
Education
Nurseries
Accreditation
Practice Management
Internship and Residency
Telephone
Patient Care
Hospitalization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education
  • Competencies
  • Continuity
  • Resident education
  • Training level

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Feigelman, S., Olsson, J., Drutz, J., Dungy, C. I., Lopreiato, J., Serwint, J. R., ... Forsyth, B. (2005). Changes in pediatric residents' perceptions of their continuity experience during their training: A national study. Ambulatory Pediatrics, 5(4), 221-227. https://doi.org/10.1367/A04-137R1.1

Changes in pediatric residents' perceptions of their continuity experience during their training : A national study. / Feigelman, Susan; Olsson, John; Drutz, Jan; Dungy, Claibourne I.; Lopreiato, Joseph; Serwint, Janet R.; Meltzer, Alan J.; Hillenbrand, Karin; Bogen, Debra; Tanz, Robert R.; Monn, Rachel; Algranati, Paula; Kittredge, Diane; Vijjeswarapu, Daniel; Riley, William J.; Pasquinelli, Lawrence; Mazurek, Jill; Reisen, Sharon; Sectish, Theodore; Schaeffer, Henry A.; Derco, Keith; Blaschke, Gregory; Hetzler, Theresea; Jaffe, Arthur; Volin, Beth; Ball, Thomas M.; Dumont-Driscoll, Marilyn; Campbell, Lisa; Collins, Rebecca; Walburn, John N.; Dabrow, Sharon; Barratt, Michelle S.; Ferguson, Laura E.; Beach, Patricia; Davis, Wendy; May, Ariane; Cantor, Gale; Kelly, Catherine; Forsyth, Brian.

In: Ambulatory Pediatrics, Vol. 5, No. 4, 07.2005, p. 221-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feigelman, S, Olsson, J, Drutz, J, Dungy, CI, Lopreiato, J, Serwint, JR, Meltzer, AJ, Hillenbrand, K, Bogen, D, Tanz, RR, Monn, R, Algranati, P, Kittredge, D, Vijjeswarapu, D, Riley, WJ, Pasquinelli, L, Mazurek, J, Reisen, S, Sectish, T, Schaeffer, HA, Derco, K, Blaschke, G, Hetzler, T, Jaffe, A, Volin, B, Ball, TM, Dumont-Driscoll, M, Campbell, L, Collins, R, Walburn, JN, Dabrow, S, Barratt, MS, Ferguson, LE, Beach, P, Davis, W, May, A, Cantor, G, Kelly, C & Forsyth, B 2005, 'Changes in pediatric residents' perceptions of their continuity experience during their training: A national study', Ambulatory Pediatrics, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 221-227. https://doi.org/10.1367/A04-137R1.1
Feigelman, Susan ; Olsson, John ; Drutz, Jan ; Dungy, Claibourne I. ; Lopreiato, Joseph ; Serwint, Janet R. ; Meltzer, Alan J. ; Hillenbrand, Karin ; Bogen, Debra ; Tanz, Robert R. ; Monn, Rachel ; Algranati, Paula ; Kittredge, Diane ; Vijjeswarapu, Daniel ; Riley, William J. ; Pasquinelli, Lawrence ; Mazurek, Jill ; Reisen, Sharon ; Sectish, Theodore ; Schaeffer, Henry A. ; Derco, Keith ; Blaschke, Gregory ; Hetzler, Theresea ; Jaffe, Arthur ; Volin, Beth ; Ball, Thomas M. ; Dumont-Driscoll, Marilyn ; Campbell, Lisa ; Collins, Rebecca ; Walburn, John N. ; Dabrow, Sharon ; Barratt, Michelle S. ; Ferguson, Laura E. ; Beach, Patricia ; Davis, Wendy ; May, Ariane ; Cantor, Gale ; Kelly, Catherine ; Forsyth, Brian. / Changes in pediatric residents' perceptions of their continuity experience during their training : A national study. In: Ambulatory Pediatrics. 2005 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 221-227.
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abstract = "Objective. - To determine how pediatric residents' perceptions of continuity clinic experiences vary by level of training, after controlling for the effect of continuity setting. Method. - Cross-sectional survey of pediatric and combined pediatric trainees in US residency programs. Results. - Survey responses were received from 1355 residents in 36 training programs. Residents' continuity experiences were in hospital-based and community settings. Numbers of patients seen increased between PGY-1 and PGY-3 years, but not in the PGY-4 and PGY-5 years. Compared to PGY-1 residents, PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents were more likely to report more encounters with established patients, but were not more likely to feel like the primary care provider. There were no significant differences by training level in terms of involvement in panel patient's laboratory results, hospitalizations, or telephone calls, although nursery involvement decreased with increasing training level. Autonomy was directly related to training level. The perception of having the appropriate amount of exposure to practice management issues was low for all respondents. Conclusions. - Residents perceived that they had greater autonomy and continuity with patients as they become more senior, yet they were not more likely to feel like the primary care provider. Lack of increased involvement in key patient care and office responsibilities across training years may reflect a need for changes in resident education. These data may be helpful in formulating recommendations to program directors with regard to determining which Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies should be emphasized and evaluated in the continuity experience.",
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T1 - Changes in pediatric residents' perceptions of their continuity experience during their training

T2 - A national study

AU - Feigelman, Susan

AU - Olsson, John

AU - Drutz, Jan

AU - Dungy, Claibourne I.

AU - Lopreiato, Joseph

AU - Serwint, Janet R.

AU - Meltzer, Alan J.

AU - Hillenbrand, Karin

AU - Bogen, Debra

AU - Tanz, Robert R.

AU - Monn, Rachel

AU - Algranati, Paula

AU - Kittredge, Diane

AU - Vijjeswarapu, Daniel

AU - Riley, William J.

AU - Pasquinelli, Lawrence

AU - Mazurek, Jill

AU - Reisen, Sharon

AU - Sectish, Theodore

AU - Schaeffer, Henry A.

AU - Derco, Keith

AU - Blaschke, Gregory

AU - Hetzler, Theresea

AU - Jaffe, Arthur

AU - Volin, Beth

AU - Ball, Thomas M.

AU - Dumont-Driscoll, Marilyn

AU - Campbell, Lisa

AU - Collins, Rebecca

AU - Walburn, John N.

AU - Dabrow, Sharon

AU - Barratt, Michelle S.

AU - Ferguson, Laura E.

AU - Beach, Patricia

AU - Davis, Wendy

AU - May, Ariane

AU - Cantor, Gale

AU - Kelly, Catherine

AU - Forsyth, Brian

PY - 2005/7

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N2 - Objective. - To determine how pediatric residents' perceptions of continuity clinic experiences vary by level of training, after controlling for the effect of continuity setting. Method. - Cross-sectional survey of pediatric and combined pediatric trainees in US residency programs. Results. - Survey responses were received from 1355 residents in 36 training programs. Residents' continuity experiences were in hospital-based and community settings. Numbers of patients seen increased between PGY-1 and PGY-3 years, but not in the PGY-4 and PGY-5 years. Compared to PGY-1 residents, PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents were more likely to report more encounters with established patients, but were not more likely to feel like the primary care provider. There were no significant differences by training level in terms of involvement in panel patient's laboratory results, hospitalizations, or telephone calls, although nursery involvement decreased with increasing training level. Autonomy was directly related to training level. The perception of having the appropriate amount of exposure to practice management issues was low for all respondents. Conclusions. - Residents perceived that they had greater autonomy and continuity with patients as they become more senior, yet they were not more likely to feel like the primary care provider. Lack of increased involvement in key patient care and office responsibilities across training years may reflect a need for changes in resident education. These data may be helpful in formulating recommendations to program directors with regard to determining which Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies should be emphasized and evaluated in the continuity experience.

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KW - Competencies

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KW - Resident education

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