Characteristics of females who use contraception at Coitarche: An analysis of the national survey of family growth 2006-2010 database

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Abstract

Study Objective: To determine demographical and behavioral characteristics associated with contraceptive use at coitarche, or first sexual experience, to determine which populations are at greatest risk of contraceptive nonuse during early sexual experiences. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We used the National Survey of Family Growth 2006-2010 database to abstract pertinent variables, including race, highest education, annual family income, parental living situation, importance of religion, age at coitarche, number of sexual partners, type of first contraception, and source of first contraception. Generalized linear models with logit link and binomial distribution were applied to examine the association between use of contraceptive methods at coitarche and the variables abstracted. Results: Of the 5931 female participants included in the study, 1071 (18%) did not use contraceptive methods at coitarche. Only 199 (2%) of the female participants included in this study used the more reliable hormonal contraceptive methods at coitarche. Black females were significantly more likely than white females to use contraceptive methods at coitarche (p <0.01). Females who initiated coitarche from 16 to 20 years of age were significantly more likely to use contraception at coitarche than females who had their first sexual experience at less than 16 years of age (p <0.001). Females with greater educational background and greater family income were also significantly more likely to use contraception at coitarche (p <0.001). Finally, females who obtained their first contraceptive methods from a spouse, partner, or friend were more likely to use contraception at coitarche than females who obtained their first method from a medical facility (p <0.001). Conclusions: This study highlights several key differences between females who use contraceptive methods at coitarche versus those who do not. Greater effort needs to be focused on increasing access to more reliable contraceptive methods for young females, as females who obtain methods from nonmedical facilities are more likely to use contraceptive methods at coitarche.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)972-977
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume24
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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Contraception
Databases
Growth
Contraceptive Agents
Surveys and Questionnaires
Binomial Distribution
Sexual Partners
Religion
Spouses
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Characteristics of females who use contraception at Coitarche: An analysis of the national survey of family growth 2006-2010 database",
abstract = "Study Objective: To determine demographical and behavioral characteristics associated with contraceptive use at coitarche, or first sexual experience, to determine which populations are at greatest risk of contraceptive nonuse during early sexual experiences. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We used the National Survey of Family Growth 2006-2010 database to abstract pertinent variables, including race, highest education, annual family income, parental living situation, importance of religion, age at coitarche, number of sexual partners, type of first contraception, and source of first contraception. Generalized linear models with logit link and binomial distribution were applied to examine the association between use of contraceptive methods at coitarche and the variables abstracted. Results: Of the 5931 female participants included in the study, 1071 (18{\%}) did not use contraceptive methods at coitarche. Only 199 (2{\%}) of the female participants included in this study used the more reliable hormonal contraceptive methods at coitarche. Black females were significantly more likely than white females to use contraceptive methods at coitarche (p <0.01). Females who initiated coitarche from 16 to 20 years of age were significantly more likely to use contraception at coitarche than females who had their first sexual experience at less than 16 years of age (p <0.001). Females with greater educational background and greater family income were also significantly more likely to use contraception at coitarche (p <0.001). Finally, females who obtained their first contraceptive methods from a spouse, partner, or friend were more likely to use contraception at coitarche than females who obtained their first method from a medical facility (p <0.001). Conclusions: This study highlights several key differences between females who use contraceptive methods at coitarche versus those who do not. Greater effort needs to be focused on increasing access to more reliable contraceptive methods for young females, as females who obtain methods from nonmedical facilities are more likely to use contraceptive methods at coitarche.",
author = "Jinhyung Lee and Abbey Berenson and Pooja Patel",
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T1 - Characteristics of females who use contraception at Coitarche

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AU - Lee, Jinhyung

AU - Berenson, Abbey

AU - Patel, Pooja

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N2 - Study Objective: To determine demographical and behavioral characteristics associated with contraceptive use at coitarche, or first sexual experience, to determine which populations are at greatest risk of contraceptive nonuse during early sexual experiences. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We used the National Survey of Family Growth 2006-2010 database to abstract pertinent variables, including race, highest education, annual family income, parental living situation, importance of religion, age at coitarche, number of sexual partners, type of first contraception, and source of first contraception. Generalized linear models with logit link and binomial distribution were applied to examine the association between use of contraceptive methods at coitarche and the variables abstracted. Results: Of the 5931 female participants included in the study, 1071 (18%) did not use contraceptive methods at coitarche. Only 199 (2%) of the female participants included in this study used the more reliable hormonal contraceptive methods at coitarche. Black females were significantly more likely than white females to use contraceptive methods at coitarche (p <0.01). Females who initiated coitarche from 16 to 20 years of age were significantly more likely to use contraception at coitarche than females who had their first sexual experience at less than 16 years of age (p <0.001). Females with greater educational background and greater family income were also significantly more likely to use contraception at coitarche (p <0.001). Finally, females who obtained their first contraceptive methods from a spouse, partner, or friend were more likely to use contraception at coitarche than females who obtained their first method from a medical facility (p <0.001). Conclusions: This study highlights several key differences between females who use contraceptive methods at coitarche versus those who do not. Greater effort needs to be focused on increasing access to more reliable contraceptive methods for young females, as females who obtain methods from nonmedical facilities are more likely to use contraceptive methods at coitarche.

AB - Study Objective: To determine demographical and behavioral characteristics associated with contraceptive use at coitarche, or first sexual experience, to determine which populations are at greatest risk of contraceptive nonuse during early sexual experiences. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We used the National Survey of Family Growth 2006-2010 database to abstract pertinent variables, including race, highest education, annual family income, parental living situation, importance of religion, age at coitarche, number of sexual partners, type of first contraception, and source of first contraception. Generalized linear models with logit link and binomial distribution were applied to examine the association between use of contraceptive methods at coitarche and the variables abstracted. Results: Of the 5931 female participants included in the study, 1071 (18%) did not use contraceptive methods at coitarche. Only 199 (2%) of the female participants included in this study used the more reliable hormonal contraceptive methods at coitarche. Black females were significantly more likely than white females to use contraceptive methods at coitarche (p <0.01). Females who initiated coitarche from 16 to 20 years of age were significantly more likely to use contraception at coitarche than females who had their first sexual experience at less than 16 years of age (p <0.001). Females with greater educational background and greater family income were also significantly more likely to use contraception at coitarche (p <0.001). Finally, females who obtained their first contraceptive methods from a spouse, partner, or friend were more likely to use contraception at coitarche than females who obtained their first method from a medical facility (p <0.001). Conclusions: This study highlights several key differences between females who use contraceptive methods at coitarche versus those who do not. Greater effort needs to be focused on increasing access to more reliable contraceptive methods for young females, as females who obtain methods from nonmedical facilities are more likely to use contraceptive methods at coitarche.

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