Characterization of the reconstructed 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic virus

Terrence M. Tumpey, Christopher F. Basler, Patricia Aguilar, Hui Zeng, Alicia Solórzano, David E. Swayne, Nancy J. Cox, Jacqueline M. Katz, Jeffery K. Taubenger, Peter Pales, Adolfo García-Sastre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

847 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pandemic influenza virus of 1918-1919 killed an estimated 20 to 50 million people worldwide. With the recent availability of the complete 1918 influenza virus coding sequence, we used reverse genetics to generate an influenza virus bearing all eight gene segments of the pandemic virus to study the properties associated with its extraordinary virulence. In stark contrast to contemporary humsn influenza H1N1 viruses, the 1918 pandemic virus had the ability to replicate in the absence of trypsin, caused death in mice and embryonated chicken eggs, and displayed a high-growth phenotype in human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, the coordinated expression of the 1918 virus genes most certainly confers the unique high-virulence phenotype observed with this pandemic virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-80
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume310
Issue number5745
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 7 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pandemics
Orthomyxoviridae
Viruses
Virulence
Phenotype
Reverse Genetics
H1N1 Subtype Influenza A Virus
Trypsin
Eggs
Genes
Chickens
Epithelial Cells
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Tumpey, T. M., Basler, C. F., Aguilar, P., Zeng, H., Solórzano, A., Swayne, D. E., ... García-Sastre, A. (2005). Characterization of the reconstructed 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic virus. Science, 310(5745), 77-80. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1119392

Characterization of the reconstructed 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic virus. / Tumpey, Terrence M.; Basler, Christopher F.; Aguilar, Patricia; Zeng, Hui; Solórzano, Alicia; Swayne, David E.; Cox, Nancy J.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Taubenger, Jeffery K.; Pales, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo.

In: Science, Vol. 310, No. 5745, 07.10.2005, p. 77-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tumpey, TM, Basler, CF, Aguilar, P, Zeng, H, Solórzano, A, Swayne, DE, Cox, NJ, Katz, JM, Taubenger, JK, Pales, P & García-Sastre, A 2005, 'Characterization of the reconstructed 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic virus', Science, vol. 310, no. 5745, pp. 77-80. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1119392
Tumpey TM, Basler CF, Aguilar P, Zeng H, Solórzano A, Swayne DE et al. Characterization of the reconstructed 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic virus. Science. 2005 Oct 7;310(5745):77-80. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1119392
Tumpey, Terrence M. ; Basler, Christopher F. ; Aguilar, Patricia ; Zeng, Hui ; Solórzano, Alicia ; Swayne, David E. ; Cox, Nancy J. ; Katz, Jacqueline M. ; Taubenger, Jeffery K. ; Pales, Peter ; García-Sastre, Adolfo. / Characterization of the reconstructed 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic virus. In: Science. 2005 ; Vol. 310, No. 5745. pp. 77-80.
@article{3471dc1b74a347a5aac03d58dff31719,
title = "Characterization of the reconstructed 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic virus",
abstract = "The pandemic influenza virus of 1918-1919 killed an estimated 20 to 50 million people worldwide. With the recent availability of the complete 1918 influenza virus coding sequence, we used reverse genetics to generate an influenza virus bearing all eight gene segments of the pandemic virus to study the properties associated with its extraordinary virulence. In stark contrast to contemporary humsn influenza H1N1 viruses, the 1918 pandemic virus had the ability to replicate in the absence of trypsin, caused death in mice and embryonated chicken eggs, and displayed a high-growth phenotype in human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, the coordinated expression of the 1918 virus genes most certainly confers the unique high-virulence phenotype observed with this pandemic virus.",
author = "Tumpey, {Terrence M.} and Basler, {Christopher F.} and Patricia Aguilar and Hui Zeng and Alicia Sol{\'o}rzano and Swayne, {David E.} and Cox, {Nancy J.} and Katz, {Jacqueline M.} and Taubenger, {Jeffery K.} and Peter Pales and Adolfo Garc{\'i}a-Sastre",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1126/science.1119392",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "310",
pages = "77--80",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "5745",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterization of the reconstructed 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic virus

AU - Tumpey, Terrence M.

AU - Basler, Christopher F.

AU - Aguilar, Patricia

AU - Zeng, Hui

AU - Solórzano, Alicia

AU - Swayne, David E.

AU - Cox, Nancy J.

AU - Katz, Jacqueline M.

AU - Taubenger, Jeffery K.

AU - Pales, Peter

AU - García-Sastre, Adolfo

PY - 2005/10/7

Y1 - 2005/10/7

N2 - The pandemic influenza virus of 1918-1919 killed an estimated 20 to 50 million people worldwide. With the recent availability of the complete 1918 influenza virus coding sequence, we used reverse genetics to generate an influenza virus bearing all eight gene segments of the pandemic virus to study the properties associated with its extraordinary virulence. In stark contrast to contemporary humsn influenza H1N1 viruses, the 1918 pandemic virus had the ability to replicate in the absence of trypsin, caused death in mice and embryonated chicken eggs, and displayed a high-growth phenotype in human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, the coordinated expression of the 1918 virus genes most certainly confers the unique high-virulence phenotype observed with this pandemic virus.

AB - The pandemic influenza virus of 1918-1919 killed an estimated 20 to 50 million people worldwide. With the recent availability of the complete 1918 influenza virus coding sequence, we used reverse genetics to generate an influenza virus bearing all eight gene segments of the pandemic virus to study the properties associated with its extraordinary virulence. In stark contrast to contemporary humsn influenza H1N1 viruses, the 1918 pandemic virus had the ability to replicate in the absence of trypsin, caused death in mice and embryonated chicken eggs, and displayed a high-growth phenotype in human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, the coordinated expression of the 1918 virus genes most certainly confers the unique high-virulence phenotype observed with this pandemic virus.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=26444490055&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=26444490055&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.1119392

DO - 10.1126/science.1119392

M3 - Article

VL - 310

SP - 77

EP - 80

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 5745

ER -