Chemical hypoxia increases junctional permeability and activates electrogenic ion transport in human intestinal epithelial monolayers

J. B. Matthews, J. A. Smith, K. J. Tally, M. J. Menconi, H. Nguyen, M. P. Fink, Courtney Townsend, E. A. Deitch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The intestinal epithelial light junction restricts the paracellular permeation of ions and nonelectrolytes. We hypothesized that this function could be altered or disrupted during cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion (chemical hypoxia). Methods. T84 monolayers grown on permeable supports were studied by electrophysiologic and flux techniques. Mitochondrial and glycolytic inhibitors were used to deplete cellular ATP. Results. Transepithelial resistance to passive ion flow (R) rapidly decreased to 36% of control values with chemical hypoxia, an effect that was reversible if control conditions were restored within 1 hour. As ATP levels declined, a transient Cl- secretory current developed but disappeared as ATP levels reached 5% of control values. Both the secretory current and fall in R were abolished when ambient Cl- was replaced with gluconate but not with Br- or NO3 -, or when N-methylglucamine replaced Na+. Transepithelial flux of mannitol but not inulin was increased during ATP depletion. Dual Na+-mannitol flux analysis confirmed that the decrease in R was due to an increase in paracellular, not transcellular, permeability. Dilution potentials indicated altered charge selectivity of the junctional pathway. Conclusions. Chemical hypoxia in intestinal epithelial monolayers alters but does not disrupt the permselectivity properties of the junctional complex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-158
Number of pages9
JournalSurgery
Volume116
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ion Transport
Permeability
Adenosine Triphosphate
Mannitol
Ions
Meglumine
Inulin
Hypoxia
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Matthews, J. B., Smith, J. A., Tally, K. J., Menconi, M. J., Nguyen, H., Fink, M. P., ... Deitch, E. A. (1994). Chemical hypoxia increases junctional permeability and activates electrogenic ion transport in human intestinal epithelial monolayers. Surgery, 116(2), 150-158.

Chemical hypoxia increases junctional permeability and activates electrogenic ion transport in human intestinal epithelial monolayers. / Matthews, J. B.; Smith, J. A.; Tally, K. J.; Menconi, M. J.; Nguyen, H.; Fink, M. P.; Townsend, Courtney; Deitch, E. A.

In: Surgery, Vol. 116, No. 2, 1994, p. 150-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matthews, JB, Smith, JA, Tally, KJ, Menconi, MJ, Nguyen, H, Fink, MP, Townsend, C & Deitch, EA 1994, 'Chemical hypoxia increases junctional permeability and activates electrogenic ion transport in human intestinal epithelial monolayers', Surgery, vol. 116, no. 2, pp. 150-158.
Matthews JB, Smith JA, Tally KJ, Menconi MJ, Nguyen H, Fink MP et al. Chemical hypoxia increases junctional permeability and activates electrogenic ion transport in human intestinal epithelial monolayers. Surgery. 1994;116(2):150-158.
Matthews, J. B. ; Smith, J. A. ; Tally, K. J. ; Menconi, M. J. ; Nguyen, H. ; Fink, M. P. ; Townsend, Courtney ; Deitch, E. A. / Chemical hypoxia increases junctional permeability and activates electrogenic ion transport in human intestinal epithelial monolayers. In: Surgery. 1994 ; Vol. 116, No. 2. pp. 150-158.
@article{2e3af1aaa4a44bada6e450a143d2d605,
title = "Chemical hypoxia increases junctional permeability and activates electrogenic ion transport in human intestinal epithelial monolayers",
abstract = "Background. The intestinal epithelial light junction restricts the paracellular permeation of ions and nonelectrolytes. We hypothesized that this function could be altered or disrupted during cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion (chemical hypoxia). Methods. T84 monolayers grown on permeable supports were studied by electrophysiologic and flux techniques. Mitochondrial and glycolytic inhibitors were used to deplete cellular ATP. Results. Transepithelial resistance to passive ion flow (R) rapidly decreased to 36{\%} of control values with chemical hypoxia, an effect that was reversible if control conditions were restored within 1 hour. As ATP levels declined, a transient Cl- secretory current developed but disappeared as ATP levels reached 5{\%} of control values. Both the secretory current and fall in R were abolished when ambient Cl- was replaced with gluconate but not with Br- or NO3 -, or when N-methylglucamine replaced Na+. Transepithelial flux of mannitol but not inulin was increased during ATP depletion. Dual Na+-mannitol flux analysis confirmed that the decrease in R was due to an increase in paracellular, not transcellular, permeability. Dilution potentials indicated altered charge selectivity of the junctional pathway. Conclusions. Chemical hypoxia in intestinal epithelial monolayers alters but does not disrupt the permselectivity properties of the junctional complex.",
author = "Matthews, {J. B.} and Smith, {J. A.} and Tally, {K. J.} and Menconi, {M. J.} and H. Nguyen and Fink, {M. P.} and Courtney Townsend and Deitch, {E. A.}",
year = "1994",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "116",
pages = "150--158",
journal = "Surgery",
issn = "0039-6060",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chemical hypoxia increases junctional permeability and activates electrogenic ion transport in human intestinal epithelial monolayers

AU - Matthews, J. B.

AU - Smith, J. A.

AU - Tally, K. J.

AU - Menconi, M. J.

AU - Nguyen, H.

AU - Fink, M. P.

AU - Townsend, Courtney

AU - Deitch, E. A.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Background. The intestinal epithelial light junction restricts the paracellular permeation of ions and nonelectrolytes. We hypothesized that this function could be altered or disrupted during cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion (chemical hypoxia). Methods. T84 monolayers grown on permeable supports were studied by electrophysiologic and flux techniques. Mitochondrial and glycolytic inhibitors were used to deplete cellular ATP. Results. Transepithelial resistance to passive ion flow (R) rapidly decreased to 36% of control values with chemical hypoxia, an effect that was reversible if control conditions were restored within 1 hour. As ATP levels declined, a transient Cl- secretory current developed but disappeared as ATP levels reached 5% of control values. Both the secretory current and fall in R were abolished when ambient Cl- was replaced with gluconate but not with Br- or NO3 -, or when N-methylglucamine replaced Na+. Transepithelial flux of mannitol but not inulin was increased during ATP depletion. Dual Na+-mannitol flux analysis confirmed that the decrease in R was due to an increase in paracellular, not transcellular, permeability. Dilution potentials indicated altered charge selectivity of the junctional pathway. Conclusions. Chemical hypoxia in intestinal epithelial monolayers alters but does not disrupt the permselectivity properties of the junctional complex.

AB - Background. The intestinal epithelial light junction restricts the paracellular permeation of ions and nonelectrolytes. We hypothesized that this function could be altered or disrupted during cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion (chemical hypoxia). Methods. T84 monolayers grown on permeable supports were studied by electrophysiologic and flux techniques. Mitochondrial and glycolytic inhibitors were used to deplete cellular ATP. Results. Transepithelial resistance to passive ion flow (R) rapidly decreased to 36% of control values with chemical hypoxia, an effect that was reversible if control conditions were restored within 1 hour. As ATP levels declined, a transient Cl- secretory current developed but disappeared as ATP levels reached 5% of control values. Both the secretory current and fall in R were abolished when ambient Cl- was replaced with gluconate but not with Br- or NO3 -, or when N-methylglucamine replaced Na+. Transepithelial flux of mannitol but not inulin was increased during ATP depletion. Dual Na+-mannitol flux analysis confirmed that the decrease in R was due to an increase in paracellular, not transcellular, permeability. Dilution potentials indicated altered charge selectivity of the junctional pathway. Conclusions. Chemical hypoxia in intestinal epithelial monolayers alters but does not disrupt the permselectivity properties of the junctional complex.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028148928&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028148928&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 116

SP - 150

EP - 158

JO - Surgery

JF - Surgery

SN - 0039-6060

IS - 2

ER -