Chronic brain damage in HIV-infected individuals under antiretroviral therapy is associated with viral reservoirs, sulfatide release, and compromised cell-to-cell communication

Daniela D’Amico, Rosario Barone, Valentina Di Felice, Beau Ances, Brendan Prideaux, Eliseo A. Eugenin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

HIV infection has become a chronic and manageable disease due to the effective use of antiretroviral therapies (ART); however, several chronic aging-related comorbidities, including cognitive impairment, remain a major public health issue. However, these mechanisms are unknown. Here, we identified that glial and myeloid viral reservoirs are associated with local myelin damage and the release of several myelin components, including the lipid sulfatide. Soluble sulfatide compromised gap junctional communication and calcium wave coordination, essential for proper cognition. We propose that soluble sulfatide could be a potential biomarker and contributor to white matter compromise observed in HIV-infected individuals even in the current ART era.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number116
JournalCellular and Molecular Life Sciences
Volume80
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2023

Keywords

  • Calcium waves
  • Cure
  • Gap junctions
  • HAND
  • Mass spectrometry imaging
  • Reservoirs
  • White matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Pharmacology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology

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