Chronic Comorbidities and Receipt of Breast Cancer Screening in United States and Foreign-Born Women

Data from the National Health Interview Survey

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Objective: Research is limited on how immigrant status affects provider recommendations and adherence to breast cancer screening among women with chronic conditions. This study examined whether chronic comorbidities are associated with breast cancer screening recommendations and adherence, as well as differences between foreign-born and United States-born women. Materials and Methods: The study examined data from the 2013 and 2015 National Health Interview Survey on women 50-74 years of age (N=12,425). Chi-square analysis was used to assess relationships between chronic comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes, and obesity) and mammography screening recommendation and adherence (screened in the last 3 years). Multivariable binary logistic regression analysis examined the relationship between foreign-born status and mammography screening, adjusting for provider screening recommendation and chronic comorbidities. Results: Obesity and hypertension were positively associated with mammography screening recommendation and adherence (p < 0.05). United States-born women, compared with foreign-born women, had higher rates of obesity (28% vs. 24%, p < 0.001) and hypertension (44% vs. 41%, p < 0.001). Compared with normal-weight women, underweight women (odds ratio [OR]: 0.57, confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.82) were significantly less likely to report receiving mammograms. In stratified analyses, foreign-born underweight women (OR: 0.25, CI: 0.09-0.68) remained less likely to report receiving mammograms after controlling for years lived in the United States and citizenship status. Conclusion: Public health intervention efforts must encourage mammography screening for both United States-born and foreign-born women, especially those diagnosed with chronic conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)583-590
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

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Health Surveys
Early Detection of Cancer
Comorbidity
Interviews
Breast Neoplasms
Mammography
Thinness
Obesity
Hypertension
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Public Health
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Weights and Measures
Research

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • diabetes
  • hypertension
  • immigrant health
  • mammography screening
  • obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{2e71d000de0441f3bbd22efee88c4266,
title = "Chronic Comorbidities and Receipt of Breast Cancer Screening in United States and Foreign-Born Women: Data from the National Health Interview Survey",
abstract = "Objective: Research is limited on how immigrant status affects provider recommendations and adherence to breast cancer screening among women with chronic conditions. This study examined whether chronic comorbidities are associated with breast cancer screening recommendations and adherence, as well as differences between foreign-born and United States-born women. Materials and Methods: The study examined data from the 2013 and 2015 National Health Interview Survey on women 50-74 years of age (N=12,425). Chi-square analysis was used to assess relationships between chronic comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes, and obesity) and mammography screening recommendation and adherence (screened in the last 3 years). Multivariable binary logistic regression analysis examined the relationship between foreign-born status and mammography screening, adjusting for provider screening recommendation and chronic comorbidities. Results: Obesity and hypertension were positively associated with mammography screening recommendation and adherence (p < 0.05). United States-born women, compared with foreign-born women, had higher rates of obesity (28{\%} vs. 24{\%}, p < 0.001) and hypertension (44{\%} vs. 41{\%}, p < 0.001). Compared with normal-weight women, underweight women (odds ratio [OR]: 0.57, confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.82) were significantly less likely to report receiving mammograms. In stratified analyses, foreign-born underweight women (OR: 0.25, CI: 0.09-0.68) remained less likely to report receiving mammograms after controlling for years lived in the United States and citizenship status. Conclusion: Public health intervention efforts must encourage mammography screening for both United States-born and foreign-born women, especially those diagnosed with chronic conditions.",
keywords = "breast cancer, diabetes, hypertension, immigrant health, mammography screening, obesity",
author = "Cofie, {Leslie E.} and Jacqueline Hirth and Abbey Berenson and Rebeca Wong",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/jwh.2018.6975",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "583--590",
journal = "Journal of Women's Health",
issn = "1540-9996",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chronic Comorbidities and Receipt of Breast Cancer Screening in United States and Foreign-Born Women

T2 - Data from the National Health Interview Survey

AU - Cofie, Leslie E.

AU - Hirth, Jacqueline

AU - Berenson, Abbey

AU - Wong, Rebeca

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Objective: Research is limited on how immigrant status affects provider recommendations and adherence to breast cancer screening among women with chronic conditions. This study examined whether chronic comorbidities are associated with breast cancer screening recommendations and adherence, as well as differences between foreign-born and United States-born women. Materials and Methods: The study examined data from the 2013 and 2015 National Health Interview Survey on women 50-74 years of age (N=12,425). Chi-square analysis was used to assess relationships between chronic comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes, and obesity) and mammography screening recommendation and adherence (screened in the last 3 years). Multivariable binary logistic regression analysis examined the relationship between foreign-born status and mammography screening, adjusting for provider screening recommendation and chronic comorbidities. Results: Obesity and hypertension were positively associated with mammography screening recommendation and adherence (p < 0.05). United States-born women, compared with foreign-born women, had higher rates of obesity (28% vs. 24%, p < 0.001) and hypertension (44% vs. 41%, p < 0.001). Compared with normal-weight women, underweight women (odds ratio [OR]: 0.57, confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.82) were significantly less likely to report receiving mammograms. In stratified analyses, foreign-born underweight women (OR: 0.25, CI: 0.09-0.68) remained less likely to report receiving mammograms after controlling for years lived in the United States and citizenship status. Conclusion: Public health intervention efforts must encourage mammography screening for both United States-born and foreign-born women, especially those diagnosed with chronic conditions.

AB - Objective: Research is limited on how immigrant status affects provider recommendations and adherence to breast cancer screening among women with chronic conditions. This study examined whether chronic comorbidities are associated with breast cancer screening recommendations and adherence, as well as differences between foreign-born and United States-born women. Materials and Methods: The study examined data from the 2013 and 2015 National Health Interview Survey on women 50-74 years of age (N=12,425). Chi-square analysis was used to assess relationships between chronic comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes, and obesity) and mammography screening recommendation and adherence (screened in the last 3 years). Multivariable binary logistic regression analysis examined the relationship between foreign-born status and mammography screening, adjusting for provider screening recommendation and chronic comorbidities. Results: Obesity and hypertension were positively associated with mammography screening recommendation and adherence (p < 0.05). United States-born women, compared with foreign-born women, had higher rates of obesity (28% vs. 24%, p < 0.001) and hypertension (44% vs. 41%, p < 0.001). Compared with normal-weight women, underweight women (odds ratio [OR]: 0.57, confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.82) were significantly less likely to report receiving mammograms. In stratified analyses, foreign-born underweight women (OR: 0.25, CI: 0.09-0.68) remained less likely to report receiving mammograms after controlling for years lived in the United States and citizenship status. Conclusion: Public health intervention efforts must encourage mammography screening for both United States-born and foreign-born women, especially those diagnosed with chronic conditions.

KW - breast cancer

KW - diabetes

KW - hypertension

KW - immigrant health

KW - mammography screening

KW - obesity

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U2 - 10.1089/jwh.2018.6975

DO - 10.1089/jwh.2018.6975

M3 - Review article

VL - 28

SP - 583

EP - 590

JO - Journal of Women's Health

JF - Journal of Women's Health

SN - 1540-9996

IS - 5

ER -