Circulating calcitonin gene-related peptide and its placental origins in normotensive and preeclamptic pregnancies

Yuan Lin Dong, Madhu Chauhan, Kortney E. Green, Sujatha Vegiraju, Hui Qun Wang, Gary Hankins, Chandra Yallampalli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The present study was designed to determine plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide concentration in both maternal and fetal circulations in normotensive and pre-eclamptic pregnancies and investigate whether placenta is 1 of its origins. Study design: Maternal blood, cord blood, and villous tissue were collected from women in normotensive pregnancies and complicated with pre-eclampsia. Calcitonin gene-related peptide concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. Cellular localizations of calcitonin gene-related peptide messenger ribonucleic acid and protein expressions in placental villi were determined by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Results: The following results were reached: (1) maternal plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide concentrations increased with advancing gestation but fell after delivery; (2) both maternal and cord plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide concentrations were positively correlated with the infant birth weights; (3) compared with normotensive pregnancies, calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in both maternal and cord plasma decreased in pregnancies with pre-eclampsia; (4) in normotensive pregnancies, the plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide of the umbilical vein was higher than the umbilical artery, but no significant differences between vein and artery in pre-eclampsia; (5) calcitonin gene-related peptide messenger ribonucleic acid and protein were expressed by syncytiotrophoblast cells and villous vascular endothelial cells in normotensive pregnancies, but only weak or absent staining was observed in pre-eclamptic placentas; and (6) calcitonin gene-related peptide is secreted by villous tissue in explant culture in a time-dependent manner, but less calcitonin gene-related peptide was produced by villous tissues from patients with pre-eclampsia. Conclusion: Calcitonin gene-related peptide may play potential roles in maternal hemodynamic adaptation and fetal growth. Decreased circulating calcitonin gene-related peptide levels may be involved in maternal-fetal pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia. It is novel that placenta villous tissues might be one of the potential sources of calcitonin gene-related peptide during pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1657-1667
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume195
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide
Pregnancy
Mothers
Pre-Eclampsia
Placenta
RNA
Chorionic Villi
Umbilical Veins
Umbilical Arteries
Trophoblasts
Fetal Development
Fetal Blood
Birth Weight
Radioimmunoassay
In Situ Hybridization
Veins
Proteins
Endothelial Cells
Arteries
Hemodynamics

Keywords

  • Calcitonin gene-related peptide
  • Placenta
  • Pre-eclampsia
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Circulating calcitonin gene-related peptide and its placental origins in normotensive and preeclamptic pregnancies. / Dong, Yuan Lin; Chauhan, Madhu; Green, Kortney E.; Vegiraju, Sujatha; Wang, Hui Qun; Hankins, Gary; Yallampalli, Chandra.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 195, No. 6, 12.2006, p. 1657-1667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dong, Yuan Lin ; Chauhan, Madhu ; Green, Kortney E. ; Vegiraju, Sujatha ; Wang, Hui Qun ; Hankins, Gary ; Yallampalli, Chandra. / Circulating calcitonin gene-related peptide and its placental origins in normotensive and preeclamptic pregnancies. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2006 ; Vol. 195, No. 6. pp. 1657-1667.
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AU - Wang, Hui Qun

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