Circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations as indicators of nitric oxide overproduction in critically ill children with septic shock

Brian Krafte-Jacobs, Richard Brilli, Csaba Szabo, Alvin Denenberg, Lori Moore, Andrew L. Salzman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the relationship between circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations and to compare these markers of nitric oxide overproduction with clinical variables in children diagnosed with septic shock. Design: Prospective, controlled, clinical study. Setting: Pediatric intensive care unit and outpatient clinic in a children's hospital. Patients: Twenty-two children diagnosed with septic shock and ten age- matched healthy control patients. Interventions: Patients diagnosed with septic shock had blood specimens taken on study entry and every 6 hrs for 72 hrs for methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate determinations. Single blood specimens were obtained from controls. Measurements and Main Results: Circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations were significantly higher in children diagnosed with septic shock in comparison with healthy control children (p = .01 and .05, respectively). Peak nitrite/nitrate concentrations correlated with serum creatinine (r2 = .19; p = .04) and were inversely correlated with arterial PH (r2 =.28; p = .01) and urine output (r2 = .21; p = .03) when analyzed by log-linear regression. There were no significant relationships between methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate or between methemoglobin and any other clinical variable. Conclusions: Circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations are increased in children diagnosed with septic shock. Plasma nitrite/nitrate values correlate with selected clinical variables in these children. Circulating methemoglobin measurements are not superior to plasma nitrite/nitrate concentrations as an indicator of endogenous overproduction of nitric oxide in children diagnosed with septic shock. A need remains to develop markers of endogenous nitric oxide activity that have greater accuracy and reliability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1588-1593
Number of pages6
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume25
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Methemoglobin
Septic Shock
Nitrites
Critical Illness
Nitrates
Nitric Oxide
Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Linear Models
Creatinine
Urine

Keywords

  • Children
  • Critical care
  • Methemoglobin
  • Nitrate
  • Nitric oxide
  • Nitrite
  • Sepsis
  • Septic shock

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations as indicators of nitric oxide overproduction in critically ill children with septic shock. / Krafte-Jacobs, Brian; Brilli, Richard; Szabo, Csaba; Denenberg, Alvin; Moore, Lori; Salzman, Andrew L.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 9, 1997, p. 1588-1593.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krafte-Jacobs, Brian ; Brilli, Richard ; Szabo, Csaba ; Denenberg, Alvin ; Moore, Lori ; Salzman, Andrew L. / Circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations as indicators of nitric oxide overproduction in critically ill children with septic shock. In: Critical Care Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 25, No. 9. pp. 1588-1593.
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AU - Szabo, Csaba

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AU - Moore, Lori

AU - Salzman, Andrew L.

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N2 - Objectives: To examine the relationship between circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations and to compare these markers of nitric oxide overproduction with clinical variables in children diagnosed with septic shock. Design: Prospective, controlled, clinical study. Setting: Pediatric intensive care unit and outpatient clinic in a children's hospital. Patients: Twenty-two children diagnosed with septic shock and ten age- matched healthy control patients. Interventions: Patients diagnosed with septic shock had blood specimens taken on study entry and every 6 hrs for 72 hrs for methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate determinations. Single blood specimens were obtained from controls. Measurements and Main Results: Circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations were significantly higher in children diagnosed with septic shock in comparison with healthy control children (p = .01 and .05, respectively). Peak nitrite/nitrate concentrations correlated with serum creatinine (r2 = .19; p = .04) and were inversely correlated with arterial PH (r2 =.28; p = .01) and urine output (r2 = .21; p = .03) when analyzed by log-linear regression. There were no significant relationships between methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate or between methemoglobin and any other clinical variable. Conclusions: Circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations are increased in children diagnosed with septic shock. Plasma nitrite/nitrate values correlate with selected clinical variables in these children. Circulating methemoglobin measurements are not superior to plasma nitrite/nitrate concentrations as an indicator of endogenous overproduction of nitric oxide in children diagnosed with septic shock. A need remains to develop markers of endogenous nitric oxide activity that have greater accuracy and reliability.

AB - Objectives: To examine the relationship between circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations and to compare these markers of nitric oxide overproduction with clinical variables in children diagnosed with septic shock. Design: Prospective, controlled, clinical study. Setting: Pediatric intensive care unit and outpatient clinic in a children's hospital. Patients: Twenty-two children diagnosed with septic shock and ten age- matched healthy control patients. Interventions: Patients diagnosed with septic shock had blood specimens taken on study entry and every 6 hrs for 72 hrs for methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate determinations. Single blood specimens were obtained from controls. Measurements and Main Results: Circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations were significantly higher in children diagnosed with septic shock in comparison with healthy control children (p = .01 and .05, respectively). Peak nitrite/nitrate concentrations correlated with serum creatinine (r2 = .19; p = .04) and were inversely correlated with arterial PH (r2 =.28; p = .01) and urine output (r2 = .21; p = .03) when analyzed by log-linear regression. There were no significant relationships between methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate or between methemoglobin and any other clinical variable. Conclusions: Circulating methemoglobin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations are increased in children diagnosed with septic shock. Plasma nitrite/nitrate values correlate with selected clinical variables in these children. Circulating methemoglobin measurements are not superior to plasma nitrite/nitrate concentrations as an indicator of endogenous overproduction of nitric oxide in children diagnosed with septic shock. A need remains to develop markers of endogenous nitric oxide activity that have greater accuracy and reliability.

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