Cisatracurium in intensive care

Julian Bion, Richard C. Prielipp, David Bihari, Michael Grounds, Nigel Harper, Jennifer M. Hunter, Brian Pollard, Jane Pearson, Douglas B. Coursin, Michael J. Murray, Donald Prough, Phillip Scuderi, Jeffrey S. Vender

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a comparative multicentre study in the United States, the neuromuscular-blocking and safety profile of cisatracurium and vecuronium has been evaluated in critically ill, intensive care unit (ICU) patients requiring long-term neuromuscular block (up to 6 days) to facilitate mechanical ventilation. The mean infusion rate of cisatracurium needed to produce sufficient neuromuscular block to facilitate mechanical ventilation was approximately one-third of the mean infusion rate needed for atracurium. The mean time for recovery to a T4:T1 ratio of ≥ 0.7 was 60 min (median 50 min) for cisatracurium (as assessed by the twitch response of the adductor pollicis muscle to trains of four numbered stimulations). This value for cisatracurium was similar to that previously reported for atracurium. In contrast, the mean recovery time for vecuronium was over 380 min (median 178 min). Cisatracurium was well tolerated when given as a long-term infusion to critically ill patients; no episodes of seizure or myopathy were observed. One patient given vecuronium experienced prolonged weakness, with myopathy and neuropathy. There was a much lower incidence of prolonged drug effect in patients given cisatracurium than in patients given vecuronium. The neuromuscular-blocking and safety profile of cisatracurium make it a suitable neuromuscolar-blocking drug for use in critically ill patients in the ICU.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Opinion in Anaesthesiology
Volume9
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Critical Care
Vecuronium Bromide
Critical Illness
Atracurium
Neuromuscular Blockade
Muscular Diseases
Artificial Respiration
Intensive Care Units
Safety
cisatracurium
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Multicenter Studies
Seizures
Muscles
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Bion, J., Prielipp, R. C., Bihari, D., Grounds, M., Harper, N., Hunter, J. M., ... Vender, J. S. (1996). Cisatracurium in intensive care. Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology, 9(SUPPL. 1). https://doi.org/10.1097/00001503-199604001-00010

Cisatracurium in intensive care. / Bion, Julian; Prielipp, Richard C.; Bihari, David; Grounds, Michael; Harper, Nigel; Hunter, Jennifer M.; Pollard, Brian; Pearson, Jane; Coursin, Douglas B.; Murray, Michael J.; Prough, Donald; Scuderi, Phillip; Vender, Jeffrey S.

In: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology, Vol. 9, No. SUPPL. 1, 1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bion, J, Prielipp, RC, Bihari, D, Grounds, M, Harper, N, Hunter, JM, Pollard, B, Pearson, J, Coursin, DB, Murray, MJ, Prough, D, Scuderi, P & Vender, JS 1996, 'Cisatracurium in intensive care', Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology, vol. 9, no. SUPPL. 1. https://doi.org/10.1097/00001503-199604001-00010
Bion J, Prielipp RC, Bihari D, Grounds M, Harper N, Hunter JM et al. Cisatracurium in intensive care. Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology. 1996;9(SUPPL. 1). https://doi.org/10.1097/00001503-199604001-00010
Bion, Julian ; Prielipp, Richard C. ; Bihari, David ; Grounds, Michael ; Harper, Nigel ; Hunter, Jennifer M. ; Pollard, Brian ; Pearson, Jane ; Coursin, Douglas B. ; Murray, Michael J. ; Prough, Donald ; Scuderi, Phillip ; Vender, Jeffrey S. / Cisatracurium in intensive care. In: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology. 1996 ; Vol. 9, No. SUPPL. 1.
@article{2c03d3d3351d4af3af504c6add7a6529,
title = "Cisatracurium in intensive care",
abstract = "In a comparative multicentre study in the United States, the neuromuscular-blocking and safety profile of cisatracurium and vecuronium has been evaluated in critically ill, intensive care unit (ICU) patients requiring long-term neuromuscular block (up to 6 days) to facilitate mechanical ventilation. The mean infusion rate of cisatracurium needed to produce sufficient neuromuscular block to facilitate mechanical ventilation was approximately one-third of the mean infusion rate needed for atracurium. The mean time for recovery to a T4:T1 ratio of ≥ 0.7 was 60 min (median 50 min) for cisatracurium (as assessed by the twitch response of the adductor pollicis muscle to trains of four numbered stimulations). This value for cisatracurium was similar to that previously reported for atracurium. In contrast, the mean recovery time for vecuronium was over 380 min (median 178 min). Cisatracurium was well tolerated when given as a long-term infusion to critically ill patients; no episodes of seizure or myopathy were observed. One patient given vecuronium experienced prolonged weakness, with myopathy and neuropathy. There was a much lower incidence of prolonged drug effect in patients given cisatracurium than in patients given vecuronium. The neuromuscular-blocking and safety profile of cisatracurium make it a suitable neuromuscolar-blocking drug for use in critically ill patients in the ICU.",
author = "Julian Bion and Prielipp, {Richard C.} and David Bihari and Michael Grounds and Nigel Harper and Hunter, {Jennifer M.} and Brian Pollard and Jane Pearson and Coursin, {Douglas B.} and Murray, {Michael J.} and Donald Prough and Phillip Scuderi and Vender, {Jeffrey S.}",
year = "1996",
doi = "10.1097/00001503-199604001-00010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
journal = "Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology",
issn = "0952-7907",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cisatracurium in intensive care

AU - Bion, Julian

AU - Prielipp, Richard C.

AU - Bihari, David

AU - Grounds, Michael

AU - Harper, Nigel

AU - Hunter, Jennifer M.

AU - Pollard, Brian

AU - Pearson, Jane

AU - Coursin, Douglas B.

AU - Murray, Michael J.

AU - Prough, Donald

AU - Scuderi, Phillip

AU - Vender, Jeffrey S.

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - In a comparative multicentre study in the United States, the neuromuscular-blocking and safety profile of cisatracurium and vecuronium has been evaluated in critically ill, intensive care unit (ICU) patients requiring long-term neuromuscular block (up to 6 days) to facilitate mechanical ventilation. The mean infusion rate of cisatracurium needed to produce sufficient neuromuscular block to facilitate mechanical ventilation was approximately one-third of the mean infusion rate needed for atracurium. The mean time for recovery to a T4:T1 ratio of ≥ 0.7 was 60 min (median 50 min) for cisatracurium (as assessed by the twitch response of the adductor pollicis muscle to trains of four numbered stimulations). This value for cisatracurium was similar to that previously reported for atracurium. In contrast, the mean recovery time for vecuronium was over 380 min (median 178 min). Cisatracurium was well tolerated when given as a long-term infusion to critically ill patients; no episodes of seizure or myopathy were observed. One patient given vecuronium experienced prolonged weakness, with myopathy and neuropathy. There was a much lower incidence of prolonged drug effect in patients given cisatracurium than in patients given vecuronium. The neuromuscular-blocking and safety profile of cisatracurium make it a suitable neuromuscolar-blocking drug for use in critically ill patients in the ICU.

AB - In a comparative multicentre study in the United States, the neuromuscular-blocking and safety profile of cisatracurium and vecuronium has been evaluated in critically ill, intensive care unit (ICU) patients requiring long-term neuromuscular block (up to 6 days) to facilitate mechanical ventilation. The mean infusion rate of cisatracurium needed to produce sufficient neuromuscular block to facilitate mechanical ventilation was approximately one-third of the mean infusion rate needed for atracurium. The mean time for recovery to a T4:T1 ratio of ≥ 0.7 was 60 min (median 50 min) for cisatracurium (as assessed by the twitch response of the adductor pollicis muscle to trains of four numbered stimulations). This value for cisatracurium was similar to that previously reported for atracurium. In contrast, the mean recovery time for vecuronium was over 380 min (median 178 min). Cisatracurium was well tolerated when given as a long-term infusion to critically ill patients; no episodes of seizure or myopathy were observed. One patient given vecuronium experienced prolonged weakness, with myopathy and neuropathy. There was a much lower incidence of prolonged drug effect in patients given cisatracurium than in patients given vecuronium. The neuromuscular-blocking and safety profile of cisatracurium make it a suitable neuromuscolar-blocking drug for use in critically ill patients in the ICU.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=9344234977&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=9344234977&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00001503-199604001-00010

DO - 10.1097/00001503-199604001-00010

M3 - Article

VL - 9

JO - Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology

JF - Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology

SN - 0952-7907

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -