Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes Among People Living With HIV Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Insights From the Veterans Affairs Clinical Assessment, Reporting, and Tracking Program

Rushi V. Parikh, Annika Hebbe, Anna E. Barón, Gary K. Grunwald, Mary E. Plomondon, Jonathan Gordin, Robert W. Yeh, Hani Jneid, Rajesh V. Swaminathan, Stephen W. Waldo, Alexander Monto, Eric Secemsky, Priscilla Y. Hsue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Clinical characteristics and outcomes in people living with HIV (PLWH) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remain poorly described. We sought to compare real-world treatment of coronary artery disease, as well as patient and procedural factors and outcomes after PCI between PLWH and uninfected controls. METHODS AND RESULTS: We utilized procedural registry data from the Veterans Affairs Clinical Assessment, Reporting, and Tracking Program between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2019 to analyze patients with obstructive coronary artery disease on angiography. In the PCI subgroup, we used inverse probability of treatment weighting and applied Cox proportional hazards to evaluate the association of HIV serostatus with outcomes, including all-cause mortality at 5 years. Among 184 310 patients with obstructive coronary artery disease, treatment strategy was similar between PLWH and controls—35.7% versus 34.2% PCI, 13.6% versus 15% coronary artery bypass grafting, and 50.7% versus 50.8% medical therapy. The PCI cohort consisted of 546 (0.9%) PLWH and 56 811 (99.1%) controls. PLWH undergoing PCI had well-controlled HIV disease, and compared with controls, were younger, more likely to be Black, had fewer traditional risk factors, more acute coronary syndrome, less extensive coronary artery disease, and similar types of stents and P2Y12 therapy. However, PLWH experienced worse survival as early as 6 months post-PCI, which persisted over time and amounted to a 21% increased mortality risk by 5 years (hazard ratio, 1.21 [95% CI, 1.03–1.42; P=0.02]). CONCLUSIONS: Despite well-controlled HIV disease, a more favorable overall cardiovascular risk profile, and similar PCI procedural metrics, PLWH still have significantly worse long-term survival following PCI than controls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere028082
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 21 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • HIV
  • coronary artery disease
  • mortality
  • percutaneous coronary intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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