Clinical manifestations of vasculitis in patients with solid tumors: A case report and review of the literature

Razelle Kurzrock, Philip R. Cohen, Avi Markowitz

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    90 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Vasculitis is characterized by inflammatory changes and necrosis of blood vessels. Involvement of arteries and veins of diverse sizes throughout the body is possible and results in a multiplicity of clinical manifestations. Primary and secondary forms of vasculitis exist. Secondary vasculitis has been linked to several processes, including infections, drugs, and allergic, rheumatologic, and neoplastic disease. The majority of patients with malignant neoplasm-associated vasculitis who have been described had hematologic neoplasms. We report a patient with adenocarcinoma of the colon and vasculitis and review the 36 cases of vasculitis in patients with solid tumors documented in the world literature. The most common malignant neoplasms were non-small-cell lung cancer and prostate, breast, colon, and renal cancer. Cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis and nerve and muscle microvasculitis were the most frequently observed vasculitic subtypes. Importantly, in 71% of the cases, manifestations of vasculitis appeared before or concurrent with the initial recognition or the relapse of the tumor. Management strategies that met with success in at least half the patients in whom they were used included corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, and treatment of the underlying cancer. Prognosis may be primarily related to the ability to control the malignant neoplasm, as most of the patients who died did so because of tumor progression.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)334-340
    Number of pages7
    JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
    Volume154
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 14 1994

    Fingerprint

    Vasculitis
    Neoplasms
    Prostatic Neoplasms
    Cutaneous Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis
    Breast Neoplasms
    Kidney Neoplasms
    Body Size
    Hematologic Neoplasms
    Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
    Colonic Neoplasms
    Cyclophosphamide
    Blood Vessels
    Veins
    Adrenal Cortex Hormones
    Colon
    Adenocarcinoma
    Necrosis
    Arteries
    Recurrence
    Muscles

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Internal Medicine

    Cite this

    Clinical manifestations of vasculitis in patients with solid tumors : A case report and review of the literature. / Kurzrock, Razelle; Cohen, Philip R.; Markowitz, Avi.

    In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 154, No. 3, 14.02.1994, p. 334-340.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Kurzrock, Razelle ; Cohen, Philip R. ; Markowitz, Avi. / Clinical manifestations of vasculitis in patients with solid tumors : A case report and review of the literature. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1994 ; Vol. 154, No. 3. pp. 334-340.
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