Clinical training in self-regulation and practical pediatric hypnosis

What pediatricians want pediatricians to know

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A survey was taken of graduates of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics' (SDBP) Pediatric Hypnosis Course to describe the impact of the course on participants' practical knowledge of self-regulation and hypnosis, the acquisition through direct experience of a realistic understanding of hypnosis, their estimation of the value of the course to their practice of pediatrics, their use of techniques learned, what they would communicate to peers in pediatrics about training in this area, and their beliefs concerning barriers to professional interest in learning hypnotic techniques for primary care. Forty-eight percent (126) of course graduates responded to the survey. Sixty-five percent of these were physicians; almost all were pediatricians. The overwhelming positive response of these pediatricians to the value of the course (4.4 on a scale of 5), the utility of hypnosis, its ease of use, and its practicality for primary care were conveyed richly in survey comments. Sixty-three percent reported that their practice satisfaction increased as a result of this training, and 64% recommended a course like this to all general pediatricians. Course graduates were concerned that the widespread mythology and strong feelings surrounding the term "hypnosis" eclipsed its empirical validation and its practical uses and was a significant barrier to interest in learning hypnotic techniques: 75% thought that the term should be de-emphasized in continuing medical education communications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-322
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume17
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hypnosis
Pediatrics
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Primary Health Care
Mythology
Learning
Continuing Medical Education
Emotions
Communication
Self-Control
Pediatricians
Physicians
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Pediatric hypnosis
  • Pediatric hypnosis training
  • Pediatricians
  • Self-regulation survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

@article{a9693fa3e0994f09966b0e9cafe1f7d5,
title = "Clinical training in self-regulation and practical pediatric hypnosis: What pediatricians want pediatricians to know",
abstract = "A survey was taken of graduates of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics' (SDBP) Pediatric Hypnosis Course to describe the impact of the course on participants' practical knowledge of self-regulation and hypnosis, the acquisition through direct experience of a realistic understanding of hypnosis, their estimation of the value of the course to their practice of pediatrics, their use of techniques learned, what they would communicate to peers in pediatrics about training in this area, and their beliefs concerning barriers to professional interest in learning hypnotic techniques for primary care. Forty-eight percent (126) of course graduates responded to the survey. Sixty-five percent of these were physicians; almost all were pediatricians. The overwhelming positive response of these pediatricians to the value of the course (4.4 on a scale of 5), the utility of hypnosis, its ease of use, and its practicality for primary care were conveyed richly in survey comments. Sixty-three percent reported that their practice satisfaction increased as a result of this training, and 64{\%} recommended a course like this to all general pediatricians. Course graduates were concerned that the widespread mythology and strong feelings surrounding the term {"}hypnosis{"} eclipsed its empirical validation and its practical uses and was a significant barrier to interest in learning hypnotic techniques: 75{\%} thought that the term should be de-emphasized in continuing medical education communications.",
keywords = "Pediatric hypnosis, Pediatric hypnosis training, Pediatricians, Self-regulation survey",
author = "William Mize",
year = "1996",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "317--322",
journal = "Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics",
issn = "0196-206X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical training in self-regulation and practical pediatric hypnosis

T2 - What pediatricians want pediatricians to know

AU - Mize, William

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - A survey was taken of graduates of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics' (SDBP) Pediatric Hypnosis Course to describe the impact of the course on participants' practical knowledge of self-regulation and hypnosis, the acquisition through direct experience of a realistic understanding of hypnosis, their estimation of the value of the course to their practice of pediatrics, their use of techniques learned, what they would communicate to peers in pediatrics about training in this area, and their beliefs concerning barriers to professional interest in learning hypnotic techniques for primary care. Forty-eight percent (126) of course graduates responded to the survey. Sixty-five percent of these were physicians; almost all were pediatricians. The overwhelming positive response of these pediatricians to the value of the course (4.4 on a scale of 5), the utility of hypnosis, its ease of use, and its practicality for primary care were conveyed richly in survey comments. Sixty-three percent reported that their practice satisfaction increased as a result of this training, and 64% recommended a course like this to all general pediatricians. Course graduates were concerned that the widespread mythology and strong feelings surrounding the term "hypnosis" eclipsed its empirical validation and its practical uses and was a significant barrier to interest in learning hypnotic techniques: 75% thought that the term should be de-emphasized in continuing medical education communications.

AB - A survey was taken of graduates of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics' (SDBP) Pediatric Hypnosis Course to describe the impact of the course on participants' practical knowledge of self-regulation and hypnosis, the acquisition through direct experience of a realistic understanding of hypnosis, their estimation of the value of the course to their practice of pediatrics, their use of techniques learned, what they would communicate to peers in pediatrics about training in this area, and their beliefs concerning barriers to professional interest in learning hypnotic techniques for primary care. Forty-eight percent (126) of course graduates responded to the survey. Sixty-five percent of these were physicians; almost all were pediatricians. The overwhelming positive response of these pediatricians to the value of the course (4.4 on a scale of 5), the utility of hypnosis, its ease of use, and its practicality for primary care were conveyed richly in survey comments. Sixty-three percent reported that their practice satisfaction increased as a result of this training, and 64% recommended a course like this to all general pediatricians. Course graduates were concerned that the widespread mythology and strong feelings surrounding the term "hypnosis" eclipsed its empirical validation and its practical uses and was a significant barrier to interest in learning hypnotic techniques: 75% thought that the term should be de-emphasized in continuing medical education communications.

KW - Pediatric hypnosis

KW - Pediatric hypnosis training

KW - Pediatricians

KW - Self-regulation survey

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030254395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030254395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 317

EP - 322

JO - Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

SN - 0196-206X

IS - 5

ER -