CLPM: A Cross-Linked Peptide Mapping algorithm for mass spectrometric analysis

Yong Tang, Yingfeng Chen, Cheryl F. Lichti, Roger A. Hall, Kevin D. Raney, Steven F. Jennings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Protein-protein, protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions are of central importance in biological systems. Quadrapole Time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometry is a sensitive, promising tool for studying these interactions. Combining this technique with chemical crosslinking, it is possible to identify the sites of interactions within these complexes. Due to the complexities of the mass spectrometric data of crosslinked proteins, new software is required to analyze the resulting products of these studies. Result: We designed a Cross-Linked Peptide Mapping (CLPM) algorithm which takes advantage of all of the information available in the experiment including the amino acid sequence from each protein, the identity of the crosslinker, the identity of the digesting enzyme, the level of missed cleavage, and possible chemical modifications. The algorithm does in silico digestion and crosslinking, calculates all possible mass values and matches the theoretical data to the actual experimental data provided by the mass spectrometry analysis to identify the crosslinked peptides. Conclusion: Identifying peptides by their masses can be an efficient starting point for direct sequence confirmation. The CLPM algorithm provides a powerful tool in identifying these potential interaction sites in combination with chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry. Through this cost-effective approach, subsequent efforts can quickly focus attention on investigating these specific interaction sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberS9
JournalBMC Bioinformatics
Volume6
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Peptide Mapping
Peptides
Proteins
Protein
Mass Spectrometry
Crosslinking
Mass spectrometry
Interaction
Efficient Points
Time-of-flight
Chemical modification
Biological systems
Amino Acid Sequence
RNA
Biological Systems
Computer Simulation
Amino acids
Digestion
Enzymes
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Structural Biology
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

Tang, Y., Chen, Y., Lichti, C. F., Hall, R. A., Raney, K. D., & Jennings, S. F. (2005). CLPM: A Cross-Linked Peptide Mapping algorithm for mass spectrometric analysis. BMC Bioinformatics, 6(SUPPL. 2), [S9]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2105-6-S2-S9

CLPM : A Cross-Linked Peptide Mapping algorithm for mass spectrometric analysis. / Tang, Yong; Chen, Yingfeng; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Hall, Roger A.; Raney, Kevin D.; Jennings, Steven F.

In: BMC Bioinformatics, Vol. 6, No. SUPPL. 2, S9, 15.07.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tang, Y, Chen, Y, Lichti, CF, Hall, RA, Raney, KD & Jennings, SF 2005, 'CLPM: A Cross-Linked Peptide Mapping algorithm for mass spectrometric analysis', BMC Bioinformatics, vol. 6, no. SUPPL. 2, S9. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2105-6-S2-S9
Tang Y, Chen Y, Lichti CF, Hall RA, Raney KD, Jennings SF. CLPM: A Cross-Linked Peptide Mapping algorithm for mass spectrometric analysis. BMC Bioinformatics. 2005 Jul 15;6(SUPPL. 2). S9. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2105-6-S2-S9
Tang, Yong ; Chen, Yingfeng ; Lichti, Cheryl F. ; Hall, Roger A. ; Raney, Kevin D. ; Jennings, Steven F. / CLPM : A Cross-Linked Peptide Mapping algorithm for mass spectrometric analysis. In: BMC Bioinformatics. 2005 ; Vol. 6, No. SUPPL. 2.
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