Cognitive dysfunction in patients with brain metastases

influences on caregiver resilience and coping

Marlon Garzo Saria, Natasia Courchesne, Lorraine Evangelista, Joshua Carter, Daniel A. MacManus, Mary Kay Gorman, Adeline M. Nyamathi, Linda R. Phillips, David Piccioni, Santosh Kesari, Sally Maliski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Neurologic deficits that may be manifested as cognitive impairment contribute to the challenges faced by caregivers of patients with brain metastases. To better address their needs, we examined how caregivers respond to these challenges and explore the relationship between the patient’s cognitive impairment and caregiver resilience and coping. Methods: We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study using self-reported data from 56 caregivers of patients with brain metastases. Study participants from a comprehensive cancer center were asked to complete a series of instruments that measured their perception of the patient’s cognitive dysfunction (revised memory and behavior problems checklist, RMBC), their own personal resilience (Resilience Scale, RS), and their utilization of a broad range of coping responses (COPE inventory and Emotional-Approach Coping scale). Results: Caregivers reported that memory-related problems occurred more frequently in the patients they cared for compared to depression and disruptive behavior (mean scores 3.52 vs 2.34 vs. 1.32, respectively). Coping strategies most frequently used by caregivers were acceptance (3.28), planning (3.08), and positive reinterpretation and growth (2.95). Most caregivers scored moderate to high on the RS (77%). The coping strategy acceptance correlated significantly with the memory and disruptive behavior subscales of the RMBC. Conclusions: Given the protective effect of problem-focused coping and the high rate of caregivers utilizing less effective coping strategies in instances of worsening cognitive dysfunction, healthcare professionals need to systematically assess the coping strategies of caregivers and deliver a more personalized approach to enhance effective coping among caregivers of patients with brain metastases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1247-1256
Number of pages10
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Caregivers
Neoplasm Metastasis
Brain
Checklist
Cognitive Dysfunction
Neurologic Manifestations
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Delivery of Health Care
Equipment and Supplies
Problem Behavior
Growth

Keywords

  • Brain metastases
  • Caregiver burden
  • Cognitive dysfunction
  • Coping
  • Resilience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Cognitive dysfunction in patients with brain metastases : influences on caregiver resilience and coping. / Saria, Marlon Garzo; Courchesne, Natasia; Evangelista, Lorraine; Carter, Joshua; MacManus, Daniel A.; Gorman, Mary Kay; Nyamathi, Adeline M.; Phillips, Linda R.; Piccioni, David; Kesari, Santosh; Maliski, Sally.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 1247-1256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saria, MG, Courchesne, N, Evangelista, L, Carter, J, MacManus, DA, Gorman, MK, Nyamathi, AM, Phillips, LR, Piccioni, D, Kesari, S & Maliski, S 2017, 'Cognitive dysfunction in patients with brain metastases: influences on caregiver resilience and coping', Supportive Care in Cancer, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 1247-1256. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-016-3517-3
Saria, Marlon Garzo ; Courchesne, Natasia ; Evangelista, Lorraine ; Carter, Joshua ; MacManus, Daniel A. ; Gorman, Mary Kay ; Nyamathi, Adeline M. ; Phillips, Linda R. ; Piccioni, David ; Kesari, Santosh ; Maliski, Sally. / Cognitive dysfunction in patients with brain metastases : influences on caregiver resilience and coping. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2017 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 1247-1256.
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