Cognitive functioning in long-duration head-down bed rest

Kimberly A. Seaton, Kelley J. Slack, Walter A. Sipes, Kendra E. Bowie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: I his report is one ot a series on the Flight Analog Project, which is designed to lay the groundwork for a standard bed rest protocol. The Spaceflight Cognitive Assessment Tool for Windows (WinSCAT) is a self-administered battery of tests used on the International Space Station for evaluating cognitive functioning. Here, WinSCAT was used to assess cognitive functioning during extended head-down bed rest. Methods: There were 13 subjects who participated in 60 or 90 d of head-down bed rest and took WinSCAT during the pre-bed rest phase, the in-bed rest phase, and the post-bed rest (reconditioning) phase of study participation. Results: After adjusting for individual baseline performance, 12 off-nominal scores were observed out of 351 total observations during bed rest and 7 of 180 during reconditioning. No evidence was found for systematic changes in off-nominal incidence as time in bed rest progressed, or during the reconditioning period. Discussion: Cognitive functioning does not appear to be adversely affected by long- duration head-down bed rest. Individual differences in underlying cognitive ability and motivation level are likely explanations for the current findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAviation Space and Environmental Medicine
Volume80
Issue number5 PART 2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Bed Rest
Head
Space Flight
Aptitude
Individuality
Motivation
Incidence

Keywords

  • Cognitive function assessment tool
  • Spaceflight
  • WinSCAT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cognitive functioning in long-duration head-down bed rest. / Seaton, Kimberly A.; Slack, Kelley J.; Sipes, Walter A.; Bowie, Kendra E.

In: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 80, No. 5 PART 2, 05.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seaton, Kimberly A. ; Slack, Kelley J. ; Sipes, Walter A. ; Bowie, Kendra E. / Cognitive functioning in long-duration head-down bed rest. In: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 80, No. 5 PART 2.
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