Cognitive functioning of U.S. adults by race and Hispanic origin

Carlos Díaz-Venegas, Brian Downer, Kenneth M. Langa, Rebeca Wong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The U.S. older adult population is becoming increasingly diverse. The evidence from research using data from diverse older adult populations indicates that Hispanics have poorer performance on cognitive tests than older non- Hispanic whites (NHW). However, the evidence that older Hispanics are at an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease or related dementia (ADRD) than NHW is less clear. Interpreting the evidence from existing research on disparities between NHWs and Hispanics is complicated by the fact that few studies have differentiated between Hispanic subgroups by country of origin. In this chapter, we use the ethnic descriptor of Hispanic as interchangeable with Latino. We summarize the current evidence on disparities between Hispanics and NHW in cognitive functioning and ADRD, and factors that may contribute to these disparities. This summary focuses on the rationale for considering specific Hispanic populations when studying differences in cognitive functioning between Hispanics and NHWs. Finally, we present and discuss the findings from an analysis of data from the 2010 wave of the Health and Retirement Study (n=18,982) in which we examine differences in three cognitive domains by race/ethnicity, including four Hispanic subgroups. In this analysis, all Hispanic subgroups, except Cubans, had significantly lower scores for all cognitive domains compared to NHWs, with Puerto Ricans showing the lowest scores among Hispanics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationContextualizing Health and Aging in the Americas
Subtitle of host publicationEffects of Space, Time and Place
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages85-107
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9783030005849
ISBN (Print)9783030005832
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 22 2018

Fingerprint

dementia
Hispanic Americans
evidence
country of origin
retirement
ethnicity
health
performance
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Population
Retirement
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Díaz-Venegas, C., Downer, B., Langa, K. M., & Wong, R. (2018). Cognitive functioning of U.S. adults by race and Hispanic origin. In Contextualizing Health and Aging in the Americas: Effects of Space, Time and Place (pp. 85-107). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-00584-9_5

Cognitive functioning of U.S. adults by race and Hispanic origin. / Díaz-Venegas, Carlos; Downer, Brian; Langa, Kenneth M.; Wong, Rebeca.

Contextualizing Health and Aging in the Americas: Effects of Space, Time and Place. Springer International Publishing, 2018. p. 85-107.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Díaz-Venegas, C, Downer, B, Langa, KM & Wong, R 2018, Cognitive functioning of U.S. adults by race and Hispanic origin. in Contextualizing Health and Aging in the Americas: Effects of Space, Time and Place. Springer International Publishing, pp. 85-107. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-00584-9_5
Díaz-Venegas C, Downer B, Langa KM, Wong R. Cognitive functioning of U.S. adults by race and Hispanic origin. In Contextualizing Health and Aging in the Americas: Effects of Space, Time and Place. Springer International Publishing. 2018. p. 85-107 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-00584-9_5
Díaz-Venegas, Carlos ; Downer, Brian ; Langa, Kenneth M. ; Wong, Rebeca. / Cognitive functioning of U.S. adults by race and Hispanic origin. Contextualizing Health and Aging in the Americas: Effects of Space, Time and Place. Springer International Publishing, 2018. pp. 85-107
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