Commentary: How useful is burden of disease to set public health priorities for infectious diseases

Ruth Berkelman, James LeDuc

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

For many infectious diseases, a low burden of disease does not equate to reduced potential public health importance. Many zoonotic infectious diseases have the potential for human-to-human transmission with potentially devastating consequences as currently seen with Ebola. Policymakers should not be lulled into thinking that the best use of resources is to allocate them only to the most obvious current problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-286
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Public Health Policy
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 25 2015

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Health Priorities
Communicable Diseases
Public Health
Zoonoses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy

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Commentary : How useful is burden of disease to set public health priorities for infectious diseases. / Berkelman, Ruth; LeDuc, James.

In: Journal of Public Health Policy, Vol. 36, No. 3, 25.08.2015, p. 283-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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