Comparison of the effects on dynamic balance and aerobic capacity between objective and subjective methods of high-intensity robot-assisted gait training in chronic stroke patients

A randomized controlled trial

Young Hyeon Bae, Suk Min Lee, Mansoo Ko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) is effective for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity, but previous RAGT method does not set suitable training intensity. Recently, high-intensity treadmill gait training at 70% of heart rate reserve (HRR) was used for improving aerobic capacity and dynamic balance. Purpose: This study was designed to compare the effectiveness between objective and subjective methods of high-intensity RAGT for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity in chronic stroke. Methods: Subjects were randomly allocated into experimental (n = 17) and control (n = 17) groups. The experimental group underwent high-intensity RAGT at 70% of HRR, whereas the control group underwent high-intensity RAGT at an RPE of 15. Both groups received their assigned training for 30 min per session, 3 days per week for 6 weeks. All subjects also received an additional 30 min of conventional physical therapy. Before and after each of the 18 sessions, the dynamic balance and aerobic capacity of all subjects were evaluated by a blinded examiner. Results: After training, Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed Up and Go Test scores, VO2max, and VO2max/ kg were significantly increased in both groups (p < 0.05). These variables in experimental group were significantly greater than control group. However, the BBS score was not significantly different between both groups. All subjects completed high-intensity RAGT. No adverse effect of training was observed in both groups. Conclusion: High-intensity RAGT at 70% of HRR significantly improved dynamic balance and aerobic capacity more than RAGT at RPE of 15. These results suggest that high-intensity RAGT at 70% of HRR is safe and effective for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity in chronic stroke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-313
Number of pages5
JournalTopics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Gait
Randomized Controlled Trials
Stroke
Heart Rate
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Aerobic capacity
  • Chronic stroke
  • Dynamic balance
  • High intensity
  • Robot-assisted gait training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Rehabilitation
  • Community and Home Care
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

@article{7e79961d57e74304ac605a99c648db67,
title = "Comparison of the effects on dynamic balance and aerobic capacity between objective and subjective methods of high-intensity robot-assisted gait training in chronic stroke patients: A randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Background: Robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) is effective for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity, but previous RAGT method does not set suitable training intensity. Recently, high-intensity treadmill gait training at 70{\%} of heart rate reserve (HRR) was used for improving aerobic capacity and dynamic balance. Purpose: This study was designed to compare the effectiveness between objective and subjective methods of high-intensity RAGT for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity in chronic stroke. Methods: Subjects were randomly allocated into experimental (n = 17) and control (n = 17) groups. The experimental group underwent high-intensity RAGT at 70{\%} of HRR, whereas the control group underwent high-intensity RAGT at an RPE of 15. Both groups received their assigned training for 30 min per session, 3 days per week for 6 weeks. All subjects also received an additional 30 min of conventional physical therapy. Before and after each of the 18 sessions, the dynamic balance and aerobic capacity of all subjects were evaluated by a blinded examiner. Results: After training, Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed Up and Go Test scores, VO2max, and VO2max/ kg were significantly increased in both groups (p < 0.05). These variables in experimental group were significantly greater than control group. However, the BBS score was not significantly different between both groups. All subjects completed high-intensity RAGT. No adverse effect of training was observed in both groups. Conclusion: High-intensity RAGT at 70{\%} of HRR significantly improved dynamic balance and aerobic capacity more than RAGT at RPE of 15. These results suggest that high-intensity RAGT at 70{\%} of HRR is safe and effective for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity in chronic stroke.",
keywords = "Aerobic capacity, Chronic stroke, Dynamic balance, High intensity, Robot-assisted gait training",
author = "Bae, {Young Hyeon} and Lee, {Suk Min} and Mansoo Ko",
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doi = "10.1080/10749357.2016.1275304",
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volume = "24",
pages = "309--313",
journal = "Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation",
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T1 - Comparison of the effects on dynamic balance and aerobic capacity between objective and subjective methods of high-intensity robot-assisted gait training in chronic stroke patients

T2 - A randomized controlled trial

AU - Bae, Young Hyeon

AU - Lee, Suk Min

AU - Ko, Mansoo

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Background: Robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) is effective for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity, but previous RAGT method does not set suitable training intensity. Recently, high-intensity treadmill gait training at 70% of heart rate reserve (HRR) was used for improving aerobic capacity and dynamic balance. Purpose: This study was designed to compare the effectiveness between objective and subjective methods of high-intensity RAGT for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity in chronic stroke. Methods: Subjects were randomly allocated into experimental (n = 17) and control (n = 17) groups. The experimental group underwent high-intensity RAGT at 70% of HRR, whereas the control group underwent high-intensity RAGT at an RPE of 15. Both groups received their assigned training for 30 min per session, 3 days per week for 6 weeks. All subjects also received an additional 30 min of conventional physical therapy. Before and after each of the 18 sessions, the dynamic balance and aerobic capacity of all subjects were evaluated by a blinded examiner. Results: After training, Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed Up and Go Test scores, VO2max, and VO2max/ kg were significantly increased in both groups (p < 0.05). These variables in experimental group were significantly greater than control group. However, the BBS score was not significantly different between both groups. All subjects completed high-intensity RAGT. No adverse effect of training was observed in both groups. Conclusion: High-intensity RAGT at 70% of HRR significantly improved dynamic balance and aerobic capacity more than RAGT at RPE of 15. These results suggest that high-intensity RAGT at 70% of HRR is safe and effective for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity in chronic stroke.

AB - Background: Robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) is effective for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity, but previous RAGT method does not set suitable training intensity. Recently, high-intensity treadmill gait training at 70% of heart rate reserve (HRR) was used for improving aerobic capacity and dynamic balance. Purpose: This study was designed to compare the effectiveness between objective and subjective methods of high-intensity RAGT for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity in chronic stroke. Methods: Subjects were randomly allocated into experimental (n = 17) and control (n = 17) groups. The experimental group underwent high-intensity RAGT at 70% of HRR, whereas the control group underwent high-intensity RAGT at an RPE of 15. Both groups received their assigned training for 30 min per session, 3 days per week for 6 weeks. All subjects also received an additional 30 min of conventional physical therapy. Before and after each of the 18 sessions, the dynamic balance and aerobic capacity of all subjects were evaluated by a blinded examiner. Results: After training, Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed Up and Go Test scores, VO2max, and VO2max/ kg were significantly increased in both groups (p < 0.05). These variables in experimental group were significantly greater than control group. However, the BBS score was not significantly different between both groups. All subjects completed high-intensity RAGT. No adverse effect of training was observed in both groups. Conclusion: High-intensity RAGT at 70% of HRR significantly improved dynamic balance and aerobic capacity more than RAGT at RPE of 15. These results suggest that high-intensity RAGT at 70% of HRR is safe and effective for improving dynamic balance and aerobic capacity in chronic stroke.

KW - Aerobic capacity

KW - Chronic stroke

KW - Dynamic balance

KW - High intensity

KW - Robot-assisted gait training

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