Comparison of virtual wheelchair driving performance of people with traumatic brain injury using an isometric and a conventional joystick

Harshal Mahajan, Donald M. Spaeth, Brad E. Dicianno, Diane M. Collins, Michael L. Boninger, Rory A. Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To compare wheelchair driving performance in a driving simulator using a conventional joystick and an isometric joystick. Design: Randomized, cohort study. Setting: A research facility based in a hospital or in an independent living center. Participants: Participants (N=20; 12 men, 8 women; mean age ± SD, 30.62±10.91y) who were at least 1 year post-TBI. Interventions: Driving performance using an isometric joystick compared with a conventional movement joystick. Main Outcome Measures: Average trial completion time, and trajectory-specific measures measured orthogonal to the center of driving tasks: root mean squared error, movement offset, movement error, and number of significant changes in heading. Results: After statistically controlling for driving speed, participants were able to complete the driving tasks faster with an isometric joystick than while using a conventional movement joystick. Compared with the conventional joystick, an isometric joystick used for driving forward demonstrated fewer driving errors. During reverse driving the conventional joystick performed better. Conclusions: The customizable isometric joystick seems to be a promising interface for driving a powered wheelchair for individuals with TBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1298-1304
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume92
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Assistive technology
  • Brain injuries
  • Rehabilitation
  • User-computer interface
  • Wheelchairs, computer simulation
  • traumatic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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