Complex formation with damage recognition protein Rad14 is essential for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad1-Rad10 nuclease to perform its function in nucleotide excision repair in vivo

Sami N. Guzder, Christopher H. Sommers, Louise Prakash, Satya Prakash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nucleotide excision repair (NER) in eukaryotes requires the assembly of a large number of protein factors at the lesion site which then coordinate the dual incision of the damaged DNA strand. However, the manner by which the different protein factors are assembled at the lesion site has remained unclear. Previously, we have shown that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, NER proteins exist as components of different protein subassemblies: the Rad1-Rad10 nuclease, for example, forms a tight complex with the damage recognition protein Rad14, and the complex of Rad1-Rad10-Rad14 can be purified intact from yeast cells. As the Rad1-Rad10 nuclease shows no specificity for binding UV lesions in DNA, association with Rad14 could provide an effective means for the targeting of Rad1-Rad10 nuclease to damage sites in vivo. To test the validity of this idea, here we identify two rad1 mutations that render yeast cells as UV sensitive as the rad1Δ mutation but which have no effect on the recombination function of Rad1. From our genetic and biochemical studies with these rad1 mutations, we conclude that the ability of Rad1-Rad10 nuclease to associate in a complex with Rad14 is paramount for the targeting of this nuclease to lesion sites in vivo. We discuss the implications of these observations for the means by which the different NER proteins are assembled at the lesion site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1135-1141
Number of pages7
JournalMolecular and cellular biology
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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