Comprehensive care for patients with hemophilia

an expanded role in reducing risk for human immunodeficiency virus.

W. K. Hoots, G. R. Buchanan, R. T. Parmley, J. B. Alperin, M. Kletzel, C. L. Sexauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Hemophilia is an inherited coagulation disease that affects approximately 1 in 5,000 to 10,000 males worldwide. Chronic joint disease and other long-term complications of recurrent bleeding persist in patients with hemophilia despite improved and more available clotting protein concentrates. The best care can be provided to patients who are followed regularly in specialized treatment centers. Services of every "comprehensive" hemophilia treatment center (HTC) have expanded since previous treatment with clotting factor concentrates infected many hemophilics with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Each HTC offers therapeutic, educational, and counseling expertise in care for the complications of HIV. A nationwide network of specialists now provides care for patients with hemophilia and related congenital abnormalities. In Region VI (Texas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas), the treatment centers and their affiliates provide medical, psychosocial, orthopedic/physical therapy, dental, and case management services. Extramural funded research programs provide care and laboratory testing at no cost to individual subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-75
Number of pages3
JournalTexas Medicine
Volume87
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Hemophilia A
Patient Care
HIV
Therapeutics
Blood Coagulation Factors
Joint Diseases
Case Management
Orthopedics
Counseling
Tooth
Chronic Disease
Hemorrhage
Costs and Cost Analysis
Research
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hoots, W. K., Buchanan, G. R., Parmley, R. T., Alperin, J. B., Kletzel, M., & Sexauer, C. L. (1991). Comprehensive care for patients with hemophilia: an expanded role in reducing risk for human immunodeficiency virus. Texas Medicine, 87(6), 73-75.

Comprehensive care for patients with hemophilia : an expanded role in reducing risk for human immunodeficiency virus. / Hoots, W. K.; Buchanan, G. R.; Parmley, R. T.; Alperin, J. B.; Kletzel, M.; Sexauer, C. L.

In: Texas Medicine, Vol. 87, No. 6, 06.1991, p. 73-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoots, WK, Buchanan, GR, Parmley, RT, Alperin, JB, Kletzel, M & Sexauer, CL 1991, 'Comprehensive care for patients with hemophilia: an expanded role in reducing risk for human immunodeficiency virus.', Texas Medicine, vol. 87, no. 6, pp. 73-75.
Hoots WK, Buchanan GR, Parmley RT, Alperin JB, Kletzel M, Sexauer CL. Comprehensive care for patients with hemophilia: an expanded role in reducing risk for human immunodeficiency virus. Texas Medicine. 1991 Jun;87(6):73-75.
Hoots, W. K. ; Buchanan, G. R. ; Parmley, R. T. ; Alperin, J. B. ; Kletzel, M. ; Sexauer, C. L. / Comprehensive care for patients with hemophilia : an expanded role in reducing risk for human immunodeficiency virus. In: Texas Medicine. 1991 ; Vol. 87, No. 6. pp. 73-75.
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