Contemporary methods allowing for safe and convenient use of amniotic membrane as a biologic wound dressing for burns

David Herndon, Ludwik Branski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Partial-thickness burns involve damage to the upper layer of skin, which leaves nerve endings exposed, and therefore represent the most painful of several categories of thermal injuries. Historically, partial-thickness burns were treated conservatively by debriding the blisters, by daily tubbing and washing, and the application of new bandages with topical medications. Human amniotic membrane has been used for centuries as a biologicalwound dressing. In the past 20 years, there has been an increasing body of literature addressing the use of amniotic tissue in chronic wounds and burns. In this review, we present an overview of the use of amniotic membrane in the treatment of burns including processing methods and early clinical use. We believe that amniotic membranes have great potential in improving burn wound care in the future. Standardized processing methods and terminal sterilization ensure safety and allow the material to be available for use by health care providers around the world in clinical trials and for patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S9-S10
JournalAnnals of Plastic Surgery
Volume78
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Biological Dressings
Amnion
Burns
Wounds and Injuries
Bandages
Nerve Endings
Blister
Health Personnel
Patient Care
Hot Temperature
Clinical Trials
Safety
Skin

Keywords

  • Amnion
  • Human amniotic membrane
  • Partial-thickness burns

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Contemporary methods allowing for safe and convenient use of amniotic membrane as a biologic wound dressing for burns. / Herndon, David; Branski, Ludwik.

In: Annals of Plastic Surgery, Vol. 78, No. 2, 2017, p. S9-S10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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