Contraceptive use among adolescent mothers at 6 months postpartum

Abbey Berenson, Constance M. Wiemann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess patterns and predictors of reliable and unreliable contraceptive use among adolescent mothers in the first 6 months following delivery. Methods: We surveyed 462 women, 18 years of age or younger, at delivery and again at 6 months postpartum. Contraceptive behaviors were evaluated among the 359 adolescents who stated they were sexually active and not trying to conceive. Results: Method discontinuation and switching were common during the 6-month interval. Only 100 of 189 adolescents (53%) initially prescribed oral contraceptives were still using this method 6 months after delivery; ten of these 100 stated that they had missed at least three pills in the last cycle. Twelve (10%) of the 115 adolescents who initiated depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate failed to obtain a second injection within 4 months of the initial injection or use an alternative method. In contrast, nine of the ten women who received levonorgestrel implants were still using this method 6 months after delivery. Overall, 76% of the sample reported using reliable contraception at last intercourse. Multivariate analyses identified seven factors as predictive of reliable contraceptive use: school enrollment, not having failed a grade in school, adequate support, belief that pregnancy is likely without birth control, attendance at postpartum visit, prior abortion, and the adolescent's desire to wait at least 2 years before having another child. Conclusion: Interventions designed to reduce rapid repeat pregnancy during the adolescent years should address emotional, financial, and educational, as well as contraceptive, needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)999-1005
Number of pages7
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume89
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1997

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Contraceptive Agents
Postpartum Period
Mothers
Contraception
Contraception Behavior
Pregnancy in Adolescence
Levonorgestrel
Medroxyprogesterone Acetate
Injections
Oral Contraceptives
Multivariate Analysis
Students
Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Contraceptive use among adolescent mothers at 6 months postpartum. / Berenson, Abbey; Wiemann, Constance M.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 89, No. 6, 06.1997, p. 999-1005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berenson, Abbey ; Wiemann, Constance M. / Contraceptive use among adolescent mothers at 6 months postpartum. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1997 ; Vol. 89, No. 6. pp. 999-1005.
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