Cough reflex in lung transplant recipients

Alexander Duarte, Allen C. Myers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lung transplantation has become the standard of care for particular individuals with advanced lung disease. However, this surgical procedure involves interruption of the lower vagal nerve fibers which leads to loss of the protective cough reflex. Injury of the neural pathways involved with the sensory limb of the cough reflex is associated with an increased risk of complications involving the allograft. While loss of the cough reflex was once considered permanent, recent evidence indicates functional and structural restoration is a time-dependent process that occurs 6-12 months after lung transplantation. The implication that the cough reflex may be reestablished in lung transplant recipients provides insight into the dynamic response to airway neural injury that may lead to improvements in allograft tissue repair.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-27
Number of pages5
JournalLung
Volume190
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

Fingerprint

Cough
Reflex
Lung
Lung Transplantation
Allografts
Neural Pathways
Wounds and Injuries
Standard of Care
Nerve Fibers
Lung Diseases
Extremities
Transplant Recipients

Keywords

  • Cough reflex
  • Lung transplantation
  • Nerve injury
  • Reinnervation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Cough reflex in lung transplant recipients. / Duarte, Alexander; Myers, Allen C.

In: Lung, Vol. 190, No. 1, 02.2012, p. 23-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duarte, Alexander ; Myers, Allen C. / Cough reflex in lung transplant recipients. In: Lung. 2012 ; Vol. 190, No. 1. pp. 23-27.
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