Cross-sectional study to assess the association of population density with predicted breast cancer risk

Jeannette Y. Lee, Vicki Klimberg, Kristina L. Bondurant, Martha M. Phillips, Susan A. Kadlubar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Gail and CARE models estimate breast cancer risk for white and African-American (AA) women, respectively. The aims of this study were to compare metropolitan and nonmetropolitan women with respect to predicted breast cancer risks based on known risk factors, and to determine if population density was an independent risk factor for breast cancer risk. A cross-sectional survey was completed by 15,582 women between 35 and 85 years of age with no history of breast cancer. Metropolitan and nonmetropolitan women were compared with respect to risk factors, and breast cancer risk estimates, using general linear models adjusted for age. For both white and AA women, tisk factors used to estimate breast cancer risk included age at menarche, history of breast biopsies, and family history. For white women, age at first childbirth was an additional risk factor. In comparison to their nonmetropolitan counterparts, metropolitan white women were more likely to report having a breast biopsy, have family history of breast cancer, and delay childbirth. Among white metropolitan and nonmetropolitan women, mean estimated 5-year risks were 1.44% and 1.32% (p < 0.001), and lifetime risks of breast cancer were 10.81% and 10.01% (p < 0.001), respectively. AA metropolitan residents were more likely than those from nonmetropolitan areas to have had a breast biopsy. Among AA metropolitan and nonmetropolitan women, mean estimated 5-year risks were 1.16% and 1.12% (p = 0.039) and lifetime risks were 8.94%, and 8.85% (p = 0.344). Metropolitan residence was associated with higher predicted breast cancer risks for white women. Among AA women, metropolitan residence was associated with a higher predicted breast cancer risk at 5 years, but not over a lifetime. Population density was not an independent risk factor for breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)615-621
Number of pages7
JournalBreast Journal
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Population Density
Cross-Sectional Studies
Breast Neoplasms
African Americans
Breast
Biopsy
Parturition
Menarche
Linear Models

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • education
  • risk model
  • urban/rural

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Cross-sectional study to assess the association of population density with predicted breast cancer risk. / Lee, Jeannette Y.; Klimberg, Vicki; Bondurant, Kristina L.; Phillips, Martha M.; Kadlubar, Susan A.

In: Breast Journal, Vol. 20, No. 6, 01.11.2014, p. 615-621.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Jeannette Y. ; Klimberg, Vicki ; Bondurant, Kristina L. ; Phillips, Martha M. ; Kadlubar, Susan A. / Cross-sectional study to assess the association of population density with predicted breast cancer risk. In: Breast Journal. 2014 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 615-621.
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