Cryopreserving and deglycerolizing sickle cell trait red blood cell components using an automated cell-processing system

R. J. Ackley, A. H. Lee-Stroka, Barbara Bryant, D. F. Stroncek, Karen M. Byrne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

RBC components with rare phenotypes are sometimes required for patients with sickle cell disease, and these rare components can often be found among donors with sickle cell trait. Cryopreserving RBC components from sickle cell trait donors requires a modified deglycerolization method to preserve the integrity of the RBCs. This study evaluated the feasibility of using an automated cell-processing system to cryopreserve and deglycerolize sickle cell trait donor RBC components. CP2D/AS-3 RBC components were collected from three donors with sickle cell trait. Each component was processed with an automated cell-processing system (ACP 215, Haemonetics Corp., Braintree, MA) and cryopreserved within 6 days of collection. The components were stored at -65°C or less for at least 2 days and were deglycerolized using the automated cell-processing system's standard procedure. Before cryopreservation and after deglycerolization, several variables were measured. Deglycerolization resulted in recovery of 43.0, 76.5, and 67.5 percent of RBCs from the three sickle-cell-trait donor components compared with 80 percent or greater for all six control components. A small, dark red, jelly-like mass was noted in the bowl of the disposable set after deglycerolization of each of the three RBC sickle cell trait components. The osmolalities of all three sickle cell trait components were less than 400 mOsm/kg, but only one of the three was acceptable for a 14-day outdate. Freezing and deglycerolization of sickle cell trait donor RBC components with the automated cell-processing system resulted in recovery of some RBCs, but a decrease in RBC recovery was problematic. Modifications of the procedure are needed for processing sickle cell trait donor RBC components.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-112
Number of pages6
JournalImmunohematology
Volume24
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sickle Cell Trait
Cellular Structures
Erythrocytes
Tissue Donors
Cryopreservation
Sickle Cell Anemia
Feasibility Studies
Osmolar Concentration
Freezing
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Cryopreservation
  • Deglycerolization
  • Glycerolization
  • Sickle cell trait

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Cryopreserving and deglycerolizing sickle cell trait red blood cell components using an automated cell-processing system. / Ackley, R. J.; Lee-Stroka, A. H.; Bryant, Barbara; Stroncek, D. F.; Byrne, Karen M.

In: Immunohematology, Vol. 24, No. 3, 2008, p. 107-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ackley, R. J. ; Lee-Stroka, A. H. ; Bryant, Barbara ; Stroncek, D. F. ; Byrne, Karen M. / Cryopreserving and deglycerolizing sickle cell trait red blood cell components using an automated cell-processing system. In: Immunohematology. 2008 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 107-112.
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