Crystalloids versus colloids in the perioperative period

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fluid management has progressed rapidly in the last three decades. Current regimens are sufficient to restore systemic perfusion in the majority of patients undergoing surgery. Further progress is needed in the prehospital management and in the fluid management of patients with intracranial hypertension. Will clinicians routinely use hypertonic or combination hypertonic/hyperoncotic fluids for resuscitation in the future? At present, there is no clear answer. Pending further preclinical work, the theoretical advantages of such fluids appear most attractive in acute resuscitation of hypovolemic patients with decreased intracranial compliance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-368
Number of pages28
JournalAnesthesiology Clinics of North America
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Perioperative Period
Colloids
Resuscitation
Hypovolemia
Intracranial Hypertension
Compliance
Perfusion
crystalloid solutions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Crystalloids versus colloids in the perioperative period. / Prough, Donald.

In: Anesthesiology Clinics of North America, Vol. 14, No. 2, 1996, p. 341-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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