Dating violence and substance use among ethnically diverse adolescents

Jeff R. Temple, Daniel H. Freeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

100 Scopus citations

Abstract

Teen dating violence is a serious public health concern with numerous and long-lasting consequences. Although alcohol and drug use have been associated with dating violence, little is known about the role of specific substances, especially the use of club drugs and the nonmedical use of prescription drugs. Thus, the authors examined the association between dating violence victimization and the use of a variety of licit and illicit substances among 1,565 ethnically diverse and economically disadvantaged high school students in southeast Texas. Past year dating violence victimization was reported by 14.1% of boys and 11.3% of girls. Compared to their nonabused counterparts, youth who experienced dating violence were more likely to smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, binge drink alcohol, sniff glue to get high, use marijuana, use ecstasy, use Vicodin, and use Xanax. However, with the exception of alcohol and cigarettes, all substances were reduced to nonsignificance in multivariate analyses. No differences were found in the rate of dating violence between African American, White, and Hispanic adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)701-718
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • dating violence
  • ethnicity
  • substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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